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American Heart Association says Living near major roads may increase risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Living close to a major road may increase women’s risk of dying from sudden cardiac death, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“It’s important for healthcare providers to recognize that environmental exposures may be under-appreciated risk factors for diseases such as sudden cardiac death and fatal coronary heart disease,” said Jaime E. Hart, Sc.D., study lead author and an instructor in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts. “On a population level, living near a major roadway was as important a risk factor as smoking, diet or obesity.”

Living near a major road was associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death in women. (American Heart Association)

Living near a major road was associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death in women. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Issues E-Cigarette Recommendations

 

Reinforces Need for Tough Restrictions on Sales and Marketing to Youth

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – The American Heart Association issued new policy recommendations today on the use of e-cigarettes and their impact on tobacco-control efforts. The guidance was published in the association’s journal, Circulation.

Based on the current evidence, the association’s position is that e-cigarettes that contain nicotine are tobacco products and should be subject to all laws that apply to these products.

American Heart Association E-Cigarette Infographic. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Hospitalizations, Deaths from Heart Disease, Stroke drop in last decade

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – U.S. hospitalizations and deaths from heart disease and stroke dropped significantly in the last decade, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“Interestingly, these improvements happened in a period when there were no real ‘miracle’ clinical advancements,” said Harlan Krumholz, M.D., S.M., lead author of the “most comprehensive report card to-date” on America’s progress in heart disease and stroke prevention and treatment. “Rather, we saw consistent improvements in the use of evidence-based treatments and medications and an increase in quality improvement initiatives using registries and other data to track performance and support improvement efforts — as well as a strong emphasis on heart-healthy lifestyles and behaviors.”

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Low education levels, Smoking, High Blood Pressure may lead to increased Stroke Risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Adults smokers with limited education face a greater risk of stroke than those with a higher education, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

The combination of smoking and high blood pressure increased stroke risk the most, confirming earlier findings in numerous studies.

Blood pressure monitoring. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure monitoring. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association funding new research network aimed at preventing heart disease, stroke

 

Vanderbilt one of four major institutions in network

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Four major institutions are banding together in a new research network aimed at preventing heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the world.

The Strategically Focused Prevention Research Network Centers — funded by a $15 million grant from the American Heart Association — is designed to help people live longer, healthier lives. «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Heart Disease without coronary plaque buildup linked to Heart Attack Risk

 

American Heart AssociationBaltimore, MD – Non-obstructive coronary artery disease was associated with a 28 to 44 percent increased risk of a major adverse cardiac event such as a heart attack or death, in a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research 2014 Scientific Sessions.

Non-obstructive CAD damages the walls of the heart’s blood vessels, but doesn’t result in decreased blood flow or symptoms so it’s generally been considered to be a low-risk condition.

Heart disease without coronary plaque buildup linked to heart attack risk «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says Insomnia may significantly increase Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The risk of stroke may be much higher in people with insomnia compared to those who don’t have trouble sleeping, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

The risk also seems to be far greater when insomnia occurs as a young adult compared to those who are older, said researchers who reviewed the randomly-selected health records of more than 21,000 people with insomnia and 64,000 non-insomniacs in Taiwan.

Stroke and  insomnia - HSU study.  (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal Urges Caution with Home Medical Oxygen

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN The presence of portable, medical oxygen in Tennessee homes has grown over the past decade, and so has the need for education about the fire hazards associated with its use. Medical oxygen adds a higher percentage of oxygen to the air a patient breathes. If a fire starts in an oxygen-enriched area, the material affected will burn more quickly.

“When more oxygen is present, any fire that starts will burn hotter and faster than usual,” State Fire Marshal and Commerce & Insurance Commissioner Julie Mix McPeak said. “Tennessee has seen an influx of preventable fires involving medical oxygen. It is crucial to follow safety precautions when medical oxygen is in use in a home.” «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Department of Health says Fifty Years after Surgeon General’s landmark report on Tobacco, Too Many still Smoking, Suffering and Dying

 

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – The once commonly held belief that smoking tobacco was harmless, and perhaps even good for some, was shattered January 11th, 1964. The first U.S. Surgeon General’s report on smoking was issued that day, alerting Americans, and the world, to the deadly consequences of smoking.

In the 50 years since that report, the U.S. and Tennessee have made remarkable progress, cutting smoking rates significantly, protecting much of the population from harmful secondhand smoke and saving millions of lives. Still the battle against tobacco is far from won and too many people develop or sustain addictions to tobacco products. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Department of Health says succeed in your resolve to Quit Smoking in 2014

 

Tennessee Tobacco QuitLine Offers FREE Support to Those Who Want to Quit

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Quitting smoking is a popular New Year’s resolution each year, but how many people actually quit?

Six out of 10 smokers require multiple quit attempts to stop smoking, according to the American Lung Association, but planning ahead can greatly improve a person’s likelihood of quitting for good.

Tennessee Tobacco Quitline «Read the rest of this article»

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