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Topic: Smoking

American Heart Association says Yo-Yo Dieting Dangerous even if you’re not Overweight

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Repeatedly losing and regaining weight, known as weight cycling or yo-yo dieting, may increase the risk of death from heart disease among postmenopausal women who were of normal weight at the start of the study, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Normal weight postmenopausal women at the start of the study who lost and regained weight had: 3 and ½ times higher risk for sudden cardiac death and nearly 66% increased risk for coronary heart disease death. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association reports Poor Sleep may increase risk for Irregular Heart Rhythms

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationNew Orleans, LA – Disruptions in sleep may be raising your risks of an irregular heartbeat, known as atrial fibrillation (AF), according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2016.

Obstructive sleep apnea, sleep interrupted by pauses in breathing, is a known risk for atrial fibrillation – an irregular heartbeat that can lead to strokes, heart failure and other heart-related complications. But whether there’s a relationship between disrupted sleep and atrial fibrillation even when there’s no sleep apnea is unclear.

Poor sleep – even if you don’t have sleep apnea – may be linked to higher risks of developing an irregular heartbeat. (American Heart Association)

Poor sleep – even if you don’t have sleep apnea – may be linked to higher risks of developing an irregular heartbeat. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Smokers far more likely to develop abdominal aortic aneurysms

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People who smoke may be nearly twice as likely to develop an abdominal aortic aneurysm than the general population, but they can lower their risk of the potentially life-threating condition by quitting, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

An abdominal aortic aneurysm is a bulge in the large artery that supplies blood to the belly, pelvis and legs.

Quitting smoking can substantially reduce the risk of developing this life-threatening condition.

Quitting smoking can substantially reduce the risk of developing this life-threatening condition.

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Tennessee State Fire Marshal Warns of Fire Risks Associated with Smoking Materials

 

Tennessee State Fire MarshalNashville, TN – With state fire statistics consistently indicating smoking as a major of cause of fire loss, the Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office (SFMO) reminds Tennesseans that care must be taken with cigarettes.

Fires caused by smoking materials have had a devastating impact on the Volunteer State. The Tennessee Fire Incident Reporting System shows that during 2011-2015, Tennessee fire departments responded to 3,916 smoking-material fires.

Wherever you smoke, use deep, sturdy ashtrays. If ashtrays are not available, use a metal can or pail.

Wherever you smoke, use deep, sturdy ashtrays. If ashtrays are not available, use a metal can or pail.

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American Heart Association says Smoking leaves historical “footprint” in DNA

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smoking leaves its “footprint” on the human genome in the form of DNA methylation, a process by which cells control gene activity, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Genetics, an American Heart Association journal.

The new findings suggest that DNA methylation could be an important sign that reveals an individual’s smoking history, and could provide researchers with potential targets for new therapies.

Smoking has a very broad, long-lasting impact on the human genome. (American Heart Association)

Smoking has a very broad, long-lasting impact on the human genome. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Urges Federal Investment in Physical Activity Following CDC Study

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.   American Heart Association President Steven Houser, Ph.D., FAHA issued the following comments today on new research, released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), that examines “Physical Inactivity Among Adults Aged 50 Years and Older”:

“Physical activity can be one of the most potent medicines for overall health. Unfortunately, not nearly enough Americans choose to take it. According to a new CDC report, nearly 28 million Americans, ages 50 and up, are physically inactive.

Kids playing on a playground. (American Heart Association)

Kids playing on a playground. (American Heart Association)

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Drinking alcohol daily may enlarge heart chamber; lead to atrial fibrillation according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Despite the common perception that moderate alcohol intake is good for the heart, new research suggests long-term alcohol consumption, even as little as one drink a day may enlarge the heart’s left upper chamber (atrium) and increase the risk of developing atrial fibrillation, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

Daily, long-term alcohol consumption was associated with a five percent higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Smoking may lead to Heart Failure by thickening the Heart Wall

 

Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smoking is associated with thicker heart walls and reduction in the heart’s pumping ability, two factors associated with increased risk of heart failure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Imaging.

The study, conducted in participants of average age 75.7 and no obvious signs of cardiovascular disease, also found that higher rates of cumulative cigarette exposure — measure of how much and how long people have smoked during their lifetime — were associated with greater heart damage.

The longer and more cigarettes people smoked, the greater the damage to their hearts’ structure and function.

The longer and more cigarettes people smoked, the greater the damage to their hearts’ structure and function.

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American Heart Association says Exercise can help keep Medical Costs Down

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Getting recommended levels of exercise weekly may help keep down annual medical costs both for people with and without cardiovascular disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Although it’s well known that regular moderate exercise reduces risk of heart disease, stroke, and chronic conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure, “our findings also emphasize the favorable impact on how much you pay for healthcare,” said Khurram Nasir, M.D., M.P.H., senior author of the study and director of the Center for Healthcare Advancement & Outcomes and the High Risk Cardiovascular Disease Clinic at Baptist Health South Florida in Coral Gables.

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

Patients with heart disease who met weekly guidelines for moderate to vigorous exercise saved on average more than $2,500 in annual healthcare costs. (American Heart Association)

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Younger heart attack survivors may face premature heart disease death according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For patients age 50 and younger, the risk of premature death after a heart attack has dropped significantly, but their risk is still almost twice as high when compared to the general population, largely due to heart disease and other smoking-related diseases, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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