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American Heart Association, IBM Watson Health and Welltok Team Up to Transform Heart Health

 

AHA to Infuse Cognitive Computing, Personalization and Science-Based Standards into New Workplace Health Offering

American Heart AssociationNew York City, NY – Today, the first day of American Heart Month, the American Heart Association (AHA) announced plans to develop a first of its kind workplace health solution that leverages the cognitive computing power of IBM Watson.

In the first application of Watson to cardiovascular disease, AHA, IBM, and Welltok will create a new offering that combines AHA’s science-based metrics and health assessments with cognitive analytics, delivered on Welltok’s health optimization platform.

CEORT Employee Health Infographic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association report shows Poor Sleep in Seniors linked to Hardened Brain Arteries

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Poor sleep quality in elderly persons is associated with more severe arteriosclerosis in the brain as well as a greater burden of oxygen-starved tissue (infarcts) in the brain – both of which can contribute to the risk of stroke and cognitive impairment. The findings are reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

The relationship between cardiovascular disease and so-called “fragmented” sleep has been studied in the past, but this is the first study to look specifically for an association between sleep fragmentation and detailed microscopic measures of blood vessel damage and infarcts in autopsied brain tissue from the same individuals.

Elderly people who sleep poorly and awaken frequently are more likely to have hardened blood vessels or oxygen-starved tissue in the brain. (American Heart Association)

Elderly people who sleep poorly and awaken frequently are more likely to have hardened blood vessels or oxygen-starved tissue in the brain. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Governor’s Foundation Launches “Small Starts for Families”

 

Free, online wellness tool provides help to parents and caregivers of young children

Governor’s Foundation for Health and WellnessNashville, TN – The Governor’s Foundation for Health and Wellness, through its Healthier Tennessee initiative, today launched Small Starts for Families™, a free, online wellness tool to help parents and caregivers of children from birth to early childhood create healthier lives for the ones they love.

The Small Starts for Families tool presents simple actions families can do each day to live healthier.

Eat Healthy.

Eat Healthy.

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American Heart Association gives Seven Healthy Heart measures may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People scoring well on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 checklist for a healthy heart are less likely to develop heart failure, a condition that reduces blood and oxygen flow to the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Life’s Simple 7 encompasses seven measures that people can use to rate their heart health and take steps to improve it. The measures are: manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get physically active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says new reversible drug shows early promise in preventing dangerous Clots

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new drug that protects against dangerous blood clots in patients undergoing procedures such as angioplasty to restore blood flow through the coronary arteries, appears safe, fast, and the effects are uniquely reversible, according to early testing described in the American Heart Association journal: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology.

Antiplatelet drugs currently available to patients carry an increased risk of bleeding.

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

A uniquely acting antiplatelet agent, PZ-128, appears to be safe and fast for preventing blood clots and its effects are reversible, reducing risk for excessive bleeding. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Pleased New CDC Study Shows More U.S. Adults are Putting Out Cigarettes for Good

 

But prevalence among uninsured and those on Medicaid raises concern

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments on a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published in today’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR).

The study, which examined 2014 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data, noted that overall adult smoking rates dropped a full percentage point between 2013 and 2014. It also reported on differences in U.S. smoking rates, including that uninsured adults or those insured through Medicaid smoke at rates twice as high as those covered by private health insurance or Medicare:

Farmers' market produce stand showing assorted fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

Farmers’ market produce stand showing assorted fruits and vegetables. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says the No. 1 Killer is Invisible to most Women

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Even though heart disease and stroke are the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S., most women say they don’t have a personal connection to cardiovascular disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

A 2014 nationally representative survey of 1,011 adult women found that those who know another woman with heart disease are 25 percent more likely to be concerned about it for themselves and 19 percent more likely to bring up heart health with their doctors. The survey was developed and conducted by the Women’s Heart Alliance.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Doctors recommend HPV Vaccine for Cancer Prevention

 

Safe and Effective Vaccine Reduces Risk of Several Cancers in Men & Women

Tennessee Department of Health - TDOHNashville, TN – No one wants to hear his or her doctor say the word “cancer.” We all know things we can do to lower our chances of hearing that diagnosis:  avoid smoking, eat right, avoid sunburns and get regular screening tests like mammograms and colonoscopies as we get older. The next generation has a powerful new tool in the fight against cancer:  the HPV vaccine.

The human papillomavirus, or HPV, is extremely common; nearly everyone picks up different strains of this virus during their lifetimes, and most are harmless.

A child receiving an immunization

A child receiving an immunization

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American Heart Association says Mobile Technology may help people improve Health Behaviors

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smartphone applications and wearable sensors have the potential to help people make healthier lifestyle choices, but scientific evidence of mobile health technologies’ effectiveness for reducing risk factors for heart disease and stroke is limited, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, published in the association’s journal Circulation.

The new statement reviewed the small body of published, peer-reviewed studies about the effectiveness of mobile health technologies (mHealth) for managing weight, increasing physical activity, quitting smoking and controlling high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Vegetables at the market. (American Heart Association)

Vegetables at the market. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association, two other major organizations issue new recommendations for treating patients with High Blood Pressure and Cardiovascular Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific statement issued jointly by three medical organizations and published in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension, addresses how low to aim when treating patients with high blood pressure who also have vascular diseases.

The document provides an up-to-date summary on treating hypertension in patients who have both high blood pressure and have had a stroke, heart attack or some other forms of heart disease, said Elliott Antman, M.D., President of the American Heart Association and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Blood pressure monitoring. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure monitoring. (American Heart Association)

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