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Topic: South America

NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite data reveals reasons for Earth’s Carbon Dioxide Rise

 

Written by Dwayne Brown
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – A new NASA study provides space-based evidence that Earth’s tropical regions were the cause of the largest annual increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration seen in at least 2,000 years.

Scientists suspected the 2015-16 El Nino — one of the largest on record — was responsible, but exactly how has been a subject of ongoing research. Analyzing the first 28 months of data from NASA’s Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite, researchers conclude impacts of El Nino-related heat and drought occurring in tropical regions of South America, Africa and Indonesia were responsible for the record spike in global carbon dioxide.

The last El Nino in 2015-16 impacted the amount of carbon dioxide that Earth's tropical regions released into the atmosphere, leading to Earth's recent record spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide. The effects of the El Nino were different in each region. (NASA-JPL/Caltech)

The last El Nino in 2015-16 impacted the amount of carbon dioxide that Earth’s tropical regions released into the atmosphere, leading to Earth’s recent record spike in atmospheric carbon dioxide. The effects of the El Nino were different in each region. (NASA-JPL/Caltech)

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AAA reports National Gas Price Average Hits Highest Pump Price of the Year

 

AAATampa Bay, FL – At $2.45, today’s national gas price average is the highest recorded price for a gallon of unleaded gasoline so far this year.

The near-term combinations of numerous refinery and pipeline shut downs, tightened access to supply levels in the Gulf and anticipated high gasoline demand surrounding Labor Day weekend, means motorists may not have seen the full impact of Harvey at the pump.

Hurricane Harvey Induced Refinery and Pipeline Shut Downs Spur Short-Term Spike.

Hurricane Harvey Induced Refinery and Pipeline Shut Downs Spur Short-Term Spike.

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APSU history graduate student Katelynn DiStefano takes part in archeology dig in Peru

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Archeology may not be a career Austin Peay State University history graduate student Katelynn DiStefano is pursuing academically, but that did not stop the graduate assistant in the University’s Department of History and Philosophy from spending part of her summer searching for mummies along the northern coast of Peru.

DiStefano joined University of Alabama Ph.D. student Jenna Hurtubise, along with a small group of students and archeologists, in traveling to the South American country, where they continued Hurtubise’s work in excavating and analyzing the history of the Casma, an underexplored ancient Peruvian culture.

Austin Peay State University history graduate student Katelynn DiStefano

Austin Peay State University history graduate student Katelynn DiStefano

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NASA announces NOAA’s GOES-16 Satellite takes First Photos of Earth

 

Written by John Leslie
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationSilver Spring, MD – GOES-16, the first spacecraft in NOAA’s next-generation of geostationary satellites, has sent the first high-resolution images from its Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) instrument. Included among them are a composite color full-disk visible image of the Western Hemisphere captured on January 15th, 2017.

Created using several of the ABI’s 16 spectral channels, the full-disk image offers an example the satellite’s advanced technology.

This composite color full-disk visible image of the Western Hemisphere was captured from NOAA GOES-16 satellite at 1:07 pm EST on Jan. 15, 2017 and created using several of the 16 spectral channels available on the satellite's sophisticated Advanced Baseline Imager. The image, taken from 22,300 miles above the surface, shows North and South America and the surrounding oceans. (NOAA)

This composite color full-disk visible image of the Western Hemisphere was captured from NOAA GOES-16 satellite at 1:07 pm EST on Jan. 15, 2017 and created using several of the 16 spectral channels available on the satellite’s sophisticated Advanced Baseline Imager. The image, taken from 22,300 miles above the surface, shows North and South America and the surrounding oceans. (NOAA)

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NASA’s Geostationary Carbon Cycle Observatory to monitor Plant Health from Space

 

Written by Steve Cole
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA has selected a first-of-its-kind Earth science mission that will extend our nation’s lead in measuring key greenhouse gases and vegetation health from space to advance our understanding of Earth’s natural exchanges of carbon among the land, atmosphere and ocean.

The primary goals of the Geostationary Carbon Cycle Observatory (GeoCARB), led by Berrien Moore of the University of Oklahoma in Norman, are to monitor plant health and vegetation stress throughout the Americas, and to probe, in unprecedented detail, the natural sources, sinks and exchange processes that control carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane in the atmosphere.

From an orbit 22,000 miles above the Americas, the Geostationary Carbon Cycle Observatory will monitor plant health and vegetation stress and probe the natural sources, sinks and exchange processes of key greenhouse gases. (NASA)

From an orbit 22,000 miles above the Americas, the Geostationary Carbon Cycle Observatory will monitor plant health and vegetation stress and probe the natural sources, sinks and exchange processes of key greenhouse gases. (NASA)

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Tennessee Department of Health Cautions Travel by Pregnant Women and their Sexual Partners as Zika Virus Disease is a Threat in Vacation Areas

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Seasonal frosts that help reduce mosquito activity in Tennessee will arrive soon, bringing some relief from the blood-feeding insects.

Mosquitoes in Tennessee are currently known to transmit diseases such as West Nile virus and La Crosse Encephalitis. With 45 cases of travel-related Zika Virus Disease confirmed thus far this year in Tennessee, there is yet another reason to “Fight the Bite.”

Danger of Having a Baby with Microcephaly Should Alert Couples to Important Precautions

Danger of Having a Baby with Microcephaly Should Alert Couples to Important Precautions

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Tennessee Department of Health says Zika Virus Disease raises awareness about Preventing Birth Defects

 

Microcephaly One of Many Defects that Deserve Attention

American Heart AssociationNashville, TN – Until a recent outbreak of Zika virus disease was associated with babies born with microcephaly, many had not heard of the birth defect. Tennessee Department of Health data show approximately 45 to 50 cases occur in Tennessee each year.

Babies with microcephaly are born with heads that are smaller than expected. This can be associated with developmental delays, intellectual disabilities, problems with hearing or vision and seizures.

A newborn baby gets caressed by its new mother

A newborn baby gets caressed by its new mother

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Tennessee Department of Health says Spring Breakers, Mission Trip Members need Heightened Awareness of Mosquito-Borne Diseases

 

“Fight the Bite” Strategies Crucial in Preventing Illness

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Across Tennessee, thousands of college students, members of faith organizations, healthcare professionals and others are planning spring or summer trips to warmer locations for fun and/or for mission work.

The Tennessee Department of Health cautions travelers headed soon to these warmer climates to have an increased awareness about diseases spread by mosquitoes and to make mosquito bite prevention an essential part of their trip planning.

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AAA says Travel Concerns Push Vacation Prices Lower

 

AAA urges Americans to be informed when shaping 2016 travel plans

AAAKnoxville, TN – Media publicity regarding terrorism, the stock market, and now the Zika virus is weighing on the minds of travelers, many of whom are turning to AAA for advice on whether they should alter their vacation plans.

AAA always encourages Americans to be cautious when traveling the world, and to be aware of any health or security alerts before leaving. Although much has been made about the Zika virus, and travelers should stay informed, Federal health officials have not issued travel restrictions to those countries with active virus transmission.

2016 AAA - Top Travel Bookings «Read the rest of this article»

 

Tennessee Department of Health reports First Case of Zika Virus Disease in Tennessee

 

TDH Urges Residents & Travelers to Have Heightened Awareness about Protection Strategies

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – The Tennessee Department of Health today has received confirmation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of the first person in the state to test positive for Zika virus disease. The individual had recently traveled to South America before returning to east Tennessee.

“We have been expecting an imported case of Zika virus disease and we believe more infections are likely as people travel to and from areas where the disease is currently being transmitted,” said TDH Commissioner John Dreyzehner, MD, MPH.

Zika virus is spread to people through mosquito bites. The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting from several days to a week. Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon.

Zika virus is spread to people through mosquito bites. The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, joint pain, and conjunctivitis (red eyes). The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting from several days to a week. Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon.

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