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Topic: Stroke

American Heart Association says Cigarette Smoking associated with increased risk of Peripheral Artery Disease in African Americans

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – African Americans who smoke cigarettes are more likely than those who don’t smoke to develop peripheral artery disease, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a narrowing of arteries other then those directly serving the heart.

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

A blood clot forming in the carotid artery. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Regular Flu Shots may save Heart Failure Patients’ Lives

 

American Heart Association Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Getting an annual flu shot can save heart failure patients’ lives, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation. 

Flu season usually begins in the fall and runs through the spring, with cases often peaking during the winter months. Annual flu vaccination is regarded as a safe, low-cost way to reduce flu-related deaths and complications and is routinely recommended for patients with histories of heart disease and stroke.

Compared with skipping a flu shot, getting a flu shot was associated with an 18 percent reduced risk of premature death among newly-diagnosed heart failure patients. (American Heart Association)

Compared with skipping a flu shot, getting a flu shot was associated with an 18 percent reduced risk of premature death among newly-diagnosed heart failure patients. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says In-Hospital Infections increase odds of readmission for Stroke Patients

 

American Heart Association Stroke Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Hospitalized ischemic stroke patients with an infection are significantly more likely to be readmitted within 30 days, regardless of the severity of their stroke or other individual patient characteristics, according to new research published in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

Ischemic strokes are caused by a blockage in an artery leading to the brain and are the most common type of stroke.

Ischemic stroke patients who have an infection, even one as common as a urinary tract infection, identified while hospitalized are more likely than others to be readmitted within the first 30 days after being discharged. (American Heart Association)

Ischemic stroke patients who have an infection, even one as common as a urinary tract infection, identified while hospitalized are more likely than others to be readmitted within the first 30 days after being discharged. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Experimental Vaccine may reduce Post-Stroke Blood Clot Risk

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A vaccine may one day be able to replace oral blood thinners to reduce the risk of secondary strokes caused by blood clots, without increasing the risk of serious bleeding or triggering an autoimmune response, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension.

People who have had a stroke caused by a blood clot (ischemic strokes) often need to take medications that make their blood less likely to clot, which helps prevent another stroke.

An experimental vaccine might one day protect ischemic stroke survivors from developing blood clots and subsequent strokes. (American Heart Association)

An experimental vaccine might one day protect ischemic stroke survivors from developing blood clots and subsequent strokes. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says new physical activity findings on physical activity alarming

 

American Heart Association

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown issued the following comments on the World Health Organization (WHO)’s findings of insufficient physical activity in the world’s adult population.

According to the study, 40 percent of adults in the United States do not get the recommended amount of physical activity.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

Increase your physical activity. Adults should do at least 150 minutes of moderate activity daily and children should get at least one hour of activity every day.

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American Heart Association reports Breastfeeding may help protect Mothers against Stroke

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only good for babies, there is growing evidence it may also reduce the risk for stroke in post-menopausal women who reported breastfeeding at least one child, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death among women aged 65 and older, and is the third leading cause of death among Hispanic and black women aged 65 and older, according to the study.

The association between breastfeeding and lower risk of stroke was stronger in women who breastfed for longer than six months and for black women. (American Heart Association)

The association between breastfeeding and lower risk of stroke was stronger in women who breastfed for longer than six months and for black women. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Obesity in Young Women may set the stage for Heart Complications during and after Pregnancy

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationSan Antonio, TX – Even in young women, obesity may potentially lead to heart complications during and after pregnancy, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences Scientific Sessions, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in basic cardiovascular science.  

Obesity is a risk factor for preeclampsia, a type of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy and leaves women more prone to high blood pressure and heart disease later in life.  

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

Obesity may potentially lead to preeclampsia, a form of dangerous high blood pressure that can occur during the second half of pregnancy. (American Heart Association)

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Austin Peay State University nursing student Hunter Burkhart earns prestigious Vanderbilt award

 

Austin Peay State University (APSU)

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – When Austin Peay State University nursing student Hunter Burkhart was 8 years old, his dad suffered a heart attack. When Hunter was 9 years old, his dad suffered a stroke.

Those events arrested life for Hunter and his family. They spent weeks in the hospital, caring for his father. The memories will never fade.

Austin Peay State University nursing student Hunter Burkhart won Vanderbilt University Medical Center's Credo Award in the critical care track during a summer internship at the hospital. (Denzil Wyatt)

Austin Peay State University nursing student Hunter Burkhart won Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s Credo Award in the critical care track during a summer internship at the hospital. (Denzil Wyatt)

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American Heart Association reports Stroke survivors could gain the most from new Blood Pressure Guidelines

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Treating high blood pressure in stroke survivors more aggressively, could cut deaths by one-third, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

“The potential to reduce mortality and recurrent stroke is immense, because more than half of all strokes are attributable to uncontrolled high blood pressure,” said Alain Lekoubou, M.D., M.S., study lead author and clinical instructor in neurology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

If stroke survivors were treated so their blood pressures reach the new target of less than 130/80 mmHg, deaths might be cut 33 percent compared with previous guidelines with a higher target blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

If stroke survivors were treated so their blood pressures reach the new target of less than 130/80 mmHg, deaths might be cut 33 percent compared with previous guidelines with a higher target blood pressure. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Limited Health Literacy is a major barrier to Heart Disease Prevention and Treatment

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Limited healthy literacy is a major barrier blocking many people from achieving good cardiovascular health or benefiting from effective treatment for heart attacks, heart failure, strokes and other cardiovascular diseases, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

Health literacy is essential to navigate the health care system, use medication effectively and improve heart-healthy behaviors. (American Heart Association)

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