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Topic: Stroke

American Heart Association says Fluctuations in home-monitored Blood Pressure may raise Dementia risk

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Whether or not you have high blood pressure, your risk of dementia may be higher if your pressure varies a lot from day to day, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“Home monitoring of blood pressure may be useful to assess the future risk of dementia,” said lead study author Tomoyuki Ohara, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of neuropsychiatry at the Graduate School of Medical Sciences at Kyushu University in Fukuoka City, Japan.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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Less than half of stroke patients nationwide are prescribed recommended cholesterol-lowering medication

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nationwide, less than half of stroke patients discharged from the hospital received a prescription for cholesterol-lowering medications called statins, and the likelihood of a prescription varied by patients’ geographic location, sex, age and race, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

For patients with ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attacks (“mini-stroke”), the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association recommends statin therapy to reduce the risk of recurrent stroke and other cardiovascular events.

Many people leaving the hospital after a stroke are not getting prescriptions for statins, even though research shows the medication can reduce the recurrence of stroke. (American Heart Association)

Many people leaving the hospital after a stroke are not getting prescriptions for statins, even though research shows the medication can reduce the recurrence of stroke. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says quitting statins after stroke may raise risk of another stroke

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TXStroke patients who stopped taking statin drugs three to six months after a first ischemic stroke, the type caused by narrowed arteries, had a higher risk of a having another stroke within a year, according to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Researchers also found that discontinuing statin drugs, which lower cholesterol, between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke was linked to higher risk of death and hospitalization among the patients in the study.

Stopping statin drug therapy between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke is associated with a higher risk of another stroke within a year. (American Heart Association)

Stopping statin drug therapy between three and six months after a first ischemic stroke is associated with a higher risk of another stroke within a year. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports African Americans with Healthier Lifestyles had lower risk of High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Among African Americans, small health improvements were associated with lower risk of developing high blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

African Americans who had at least two modifiable healthy behaviors at the beginning of the study, compared to those with one or none, researchers found the risk of high blood pressure at follow-up was reduced by 20 percent.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Breastfeeding may reduce a Mother’s Heart Attack and Stroke Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breastfeeding is not only healthy for babies, it may also reduce a mother’s risk of having a heart attack or stroke later in life, according to new research published in of the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

Previous studies have suggested that mothers get short-term health benefits from breastfeeding, such as weight loss and lower cholesterol, blood pressure and glucose levels after pregnancy.

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

A study of Chinese women found that the longer a mother breastfeeds, the greater the cardiovascular health benefit appears to be. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Horse, Rhythm-and-Music Therapies may Boost Recovery after Stroke

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Horseback riding and rhythm-and-music therapies may improve stroke survivors’ perception of recovery, gait, balance, grip strength and cognition years after their stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

A variety of interventions that engage patients in physical, sensory, cognitive and social activities simultaneously target a range of functions.

Researchers said significant improvements are still possible years after stroke using motivating, comprehensive therapies that combine physical, sensory, cognitive and social components to stimulate and increase brain activity. (American Heart Association)

Researchers said significant improvements are still possible years after stroke using motivating, comprehensive therapies that combine physical, sensory, cognitive and social components to stimulate and increase brain activity. (American Heart Association)

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2017 Tennessee Legislative First Session Final Report – Part 4

 

Written by Curtis Johnson
Tennessee State Representative

Tennessee State Representative - District 68Nashville, TN – The first session of the 110th Tennessee General Assembly adjourned on May 10th, 2017, after passing major legislation that will benefit Tennesseans for generations to come. This is Part 4 of a 12 Part report.

This includes a measure making Tennessee the first state in the nation to offer all adults without a degree tuition-free access to community college; a new law rebuilding a safe and reliable transportation network, while reallocating revenues to maximize taxpayers’ return on that investment; and a bill which provides a responsible path to improve access to broadband through investment, deregulation, and education. 

Action in the General Assembly also included passage of a balanced budget which takes on no new debt, as well as legislation protecting the elderly, enhancing the state’s robust job growth, cracking down on crime, and boosting efforts as the fastest improving state in the nation in K-12 student achievement.  Following is a report on key legislation passed this year.

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

Tennessee State Representative Curtis Johnson

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Too little sleep may raise risk of death in people with cluster of Heart Disease risk factors according to American Heart Association

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People with a common cluster of risk factors for heart disease and diabetes were approximately twice as likely to die of heart disease or stroke as people without the same set of risk factors if they failed to get more than six hours of sleep, according to a new observational study published in the association’s open access publication Journal of the American Heart Association. For those who got more sleep, the risk of death was more modest.

The study, funded in part by the American Heart Association, is the first to measure sleep duration in the laboratory rather than rely on patient reports and the first to examine the impact of sleep duration on the risk of death in those with a common cluster of heart disease risk factors.

Sleep and metabolic syndrome study. (American Heart Association)

Sleep and metabolic syndrome study. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Heart Failure Patients readmitted to the same hospital may have better outcomes

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – When patients with heart failure were re-hospitalized within a month, those who returned to the same hospital were discharged quicker and were more likely to survive, according to new Canadian research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

In both Canada and the United States, ambulance policies usually require patients be taken to the nearest emergency room, even if a patient has recently been hospitalized somewhere else.

Time is important when seeking hospital care for acute events like heart attack or stroke, but for treatment of a chronic condition like heart failure, continuity of care seems to be more important, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

Time is important when seeking hospital care for acute events like heart attack or stroke, but for treatment of a chronic condition like heart failure, continuity of care seems to be more important, researchers said. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Kicking the Salt Shaker habit may not be enough

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Restaurant foods and commercially processed foods sold in stores accounted for about 70 percent of dietary sodium intake in a study in three U.S. regions, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Sodium is an important contributor to high blood pressure, one of the leading causes of heart attack and stroke. The American Heart Association recommends a maximum of 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day, which is equivalent to 1 teaspoon of salt.

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

Salt added at home during food preparation or at the table accounted for a small fraction of dietary sodium. (Copyright American Heart Association)

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