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Topic: Stroke

American Heart Association reports Older, Healthy Adults with systolic BP below 140 have Lower Stroke Risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Raising the systolic blood pressure threshold from 140 to 150 mmHg, as a new target for high blood pressure treatment in older people who don’t have chronic kidney disease or diabetes, could put this population at greater stroke risk, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension.

The increased stroke risk is even more pronounced among Hispanics and blacks, the research showed.

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

Blood pressure cuff. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association, IBM Watson Health and Welltok Team Up to Transform Heart Health

 

AHA to Infuse Cognitive Computing, Personalization and Science-Based Standards into New Workplace Health Offering

American Heart AssociationNew York City, NY – Today, the first day of American Heart Month, the American Heart Association (AHA) announced plans to develop a first of its kind workplace health solution that leverages the cognitive computing power of IBM Watson.

In the first application of Watson to cardiovascular disease, AHA, IBM, and Welltok will create a new offering that combines AHA’s science-based metrics and health assessments with cognitive analytics, delivered on Welltok’s health optimization platform.

CEORT Employee Health Infographic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association says clot buster treatment safe, effective for patients who required living assistance pre-stroke

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Intravenous clot busting may be safe and effective in patients who required daily living assistance prior to stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

A European multicenter study researched the effect of intravenous thrombolysis (IVT) – clot busting – among ischemic stroke patients with preexisting dependency – defined as unable to live alone without help from another person.

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Study shows Over 7 Million Americans With/At Risk for Cardiovascular Disease Insured under Affordable Care Act

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C. – A new study released today by the American Heart Association reveals that more than 6 million adults at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 1.3 million who have suffered from heart disease, hypertension or stroke gained health insurance between 2013 and 2014, the first year coverage was available under the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

“In just its first year of enrollment, the Affordable Care Act made it possible for millions of Americans fighting cardiovascular diseases to focus on improving their health, instead of worrying about whether they can obtain or afford the quality care they deserve,” said Nancy Brown, CEO of the American Heart Association.  «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association report shows Poor Sleep in Seniors linked to Hardened Brain Arteries

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Poor sleep quality in elderly persons is associated with more severe arteriosclerosis in the brain as well as a greater burden of oxygen-starved tissue (infarcts) in the brain – both of which can contribute to the risk of stroke and cognitive impairment. The findings are reported in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

The relationship between cardiovascular disease and so-called “fragmented” sleep has been studied in the past, but this is the first study to look specifically for an association between sleep fragmentation and detailed microscopic measures of blood vessel damage and infarcts in autopsied brain tissue from the same individuals.

Elderly people who sleep poorly and awaken frequently are more likely to have hardened blood vessels or oxygen-starved tissue in the brain. (American Heart Association)

Elderly people who sleep poorly and awaken frequently are more likely to have hardened blood vessels or oxygen-starved tissue in the brain. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association Says New Dietary Guidelines Will Help Establish a Healthier Roadmap for Americans

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association (AHA) applauds the Departments of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Agriculture (USDA) on the release of the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.

“The new federal dietary guidelines give Americans more flexibility in their diets without sacrificing their health. By providing a valuable source of nutrition information, the standards are part of a roadmap to help build a ‘culture of health’ in America. This healthier culture will help reduce our risk for heart disease and stroke – the two leading causes of death in the world,” said Mark Creager, M.D., president of the American Heart Association.

Fats - The Good the Bad and the Ugly Infographic «Read the rest of this article»

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American Heart Association announces 2015 Top Heart Disease, Stroke Research

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association is featuring the top advances in heart disease and stroke research in 2015 in a series of stories (listed below) on Heart.org.

Each story was selected by a panel of the association’s science staff and volunteers. The organization has compiled an annual list of the major advances in heart disease and stroke research each year since 1996.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association gives Seven Healthy Heart measures may reduce Heart Failure Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – People scoring well on the American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 checklist for a healthy heart are less likely to develop heart failure, a condition that reduces blood and oxygen flow to the body, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation: Heart Failure.

Life’s Simple 7 encompasses seven measures that people can use to rate their heart health and take steps to improve it. The measures are: manage blood pressure, control cholesterol, reduce blood sugar, get physically active, eat better, lose weight and stop smoking.

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

A man checking his blood pressure at an office kiosk. (American Heart Association)

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New statistics from American Heart Association shows one of every three U.S. Deaths caused by Cardiovascular Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – One of every three deaths in the U.S. in 2013 were from heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases, while heart disease and stroke were the No. 1 and No. 2 killers worldwide, according to American Heart Association’s 2016 Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics Update. 

Produced since 1958, the update is created from the most-recent data available and compiled by the AHA, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other government sources.

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

Brain Clot. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Sex differences in Type 2 Diabetes affect Cardiovascular Disease Risk

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Women with Type 2 diabetes are twice as likely to have coronary heart disease compared to men, and may also need more frequent and intense physical activity to lower their risk of having a heart attack or stroke, according to a new American Heart Association scientific statement published in the association’s journal Circulation.

In the United States slightly more than nine percent of the population had diabetes in 2012, and the number of people with Type 2 diabetes is increasing at a rapid rate.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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