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NASA’s Dawn spacecraft data used to determine age of Bright Spot on Dwarf Planet Ceres

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The bright central area of Ceres’ Occator Crater, known as Cerealia Facula, is approximately 30 million years younger than the crater in which it lies, according to a new study in the Astronomical Journal. Scientists used data from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft to analyze Occator’s central dome in detail, concluding that this intriguing bright feature on the dwarf planet is only about 4 million years old — quite recent in terms of geological history.

Researchers led by Andreas Nathues at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Gottingen, Germany, analyzed data from two instruments on board NASA’s Dawn spacecraft: the framing camera, and the visible and infrared mapping spectrometer.

The bright spots in the center of Occator Crater on Ceres are shown in enhanced color in this view from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI/LPI)

The bright spots in the center of Occator Crater on Ceres are shown in enhanced color in this view from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA/PSI/LPI)

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Tennessee Lady Vols face Alabama Crimson Tide in second round of SEC Tournament

 

Tennessee Lady Vols (19-10, 10-6 SEC) vs. Alabama (17-12/5-11)

Thursday, March 2nd, 2017 | 1:30pm CT
Greenville, SC | Bon Secours Wellness Arena

UT Lady VolsGreenville, SC – The No. 5 seed Lady Vols (19-10, 10-6 SEC) are set to play No. 12 seed Alabama (18-12, 5-11 SEC) at approximately 1:30pm CT on Thursday in the second round of the SEC Tournament at Bon Secours Wellness Arena.

The game will be broadcast on SEC Network and will be available online through WatchESPN. Courtney Lyle (PxP), Tamika Catchings (Analyst) and Steffi Sorensen (Reporter) will describe the action for the SEC Network broadcast of Tennessee’s second-round game.

Fans can also tune into their local Lady Vol Network station to catch Mickey Dearstone describing the action.

Tennessee Women's Basketball take on Alabama Thursday at 3:30pm CT in second round SEC Tournament action. (Tennessee Athletics Department) «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA’s Dawn Mission finds Evidence for Organic Material on Dwarf Planet Ceres

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Dawn mission has found evidence for organic material on Ceres, a dwarf planet and the largest body in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

Scientists using the spacecraft’s visible and infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) detected the material in and around a northern-hemisphere crater called Ernutet. Organic molecules are interesting to scientists because they are necessary, though not sufficient, components of life on Earth.

This enhanced color composite image, made with data from the framing camera aboard NASA's Dawn spacecraft, shows the area around Ernutet Crater. The bright red portions appear redder with respect to the rest of Ceres. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

This enhanced color composite image, made with data from the framing camera aboard NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, shows the area around Ernutet Crater. The bright red portions appear redder with respect to the rest of Ceres. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

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Tennessee Vols take on #13 Kentucky Wildcats at Rupp Arena, Tuesday

 

Tennessee (14-11/6-6 SEC) at #13/#11 Kentucky (20-5/10-2 SEC)

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017 | 6:04pm CT
Lexington, KY | Rupp Arena | TV: ESPN

Tennessee Volunteers - UT VolsKnoxville, TN – Tennessee heads to Lexington for a Tuesday-night showdown with No. 13 Kentucky. Tipoff at Rupp Arena is slated for 6:00pm CT on ESPN.

The Vols (14-11, 6-6 SEC) and Wildcats (20-5, 10-2 SEC) are meeting for the second time in three weeks. In the first meeting between the border rivals, UT picked up an 82-80 victory over fourth-ranked UK in Knoxville. Tennessee was led that night by 25 points from Robert Hubbs III.

Hubbs continues to lead the Vols in scoring, averaging 14.3 ppg.

Tuesday's border battle rematch between Tennessee and Kentucky tips off at 6:00pm CT on ESPN. (Tennessee Athletics Department) «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Lady Vols take on Missouri Tigers at Thompson-Boling Arena, Thursday

 

#24/25 Tennessee Lady Vols (15-8, 6-4 SEC) vs. #RV/NR Missouri Tigers (16-8, 6-4 SEC)

Thursday, February 9th, 2017 | 6:02pm CT
Knoxville, TN | Thompson-Boling Arena

UT Lady VolsKnoxville, TN – #24/25 Tennessee returns to Thompson-Boling Arena on Thursday in a contest between two of the SEC’s hottest teams over the last few weeks, the Lady Vols and the #RV/NR Missouri Tigers.

The game tips off at 6:00pm CT and will be broadcast on SEC Network and will be available online through WatchESPN. Visit WatchESPN.com or download the WatchESPN app to view the game on a computer or mobile device. Paul Sunderland (PxP), Gail Goestenkors (Analyst) and Steffi Sorensen (Reporter) will describe the action between the Lady Vols and the Tigers.

Fans can also tune into their local Lady Vol Network station to catch Mickey Dearstone describing the action.

Tennessee Women's Basketball takes on Missouri Tigers in an SEC showdown at Thompson-Boling Area Thursday at 6:00pm CT. (Tennessee Athletics Department) «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA’s Dawn spacecraft reveals new areas where Ice may hide on Ceres

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – At first glance, Ceres, the largest body in the main asteroid belt, may not look icy. Images from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft have revealed a dark, heavily cratered world whose brightest area is made of highly reflective salts — not ice.

But newly published studies from Dawn scientists show two distinct lines of evidence for ice at or near the surface of the dwarf planet. Researchers are presenting these findings at the 2016 American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

This graphic shows a theoretical path of a water molecule on Ceres. Some water molecules fall into cold, dark craters called "cold traps," where very little of the ice turns into vapor, even over the course of a billion years. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

This graphic shows a theoretical path of a water molecule on Ceres. Some water molecules fall into cold, dark craters called “cold traps,” where very little of the ice turns into vapor, even over the course of a billion years. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

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#22/25 Tennessee Lady Vols take on #4/4 Baylor at Thompson-Boling Arena, Sunday

 

#22/25 Tennessee (4-2) vs. #4/4 Baylor (8-1)

Sunday, December 4th, 2016 | 1:00pm CT
Knoxville, TN | Thompson-Boling Arena

UT Lady VolsKnoxville, TN – #22/25 Tennessee (4-2) will take on #4/4 Baylor (8-1) Sunday at 1:00pm CT in the SEC/Big 12 Challenge at Thompson-Boling Arena.

The game will be televised by ESPN2, but fans can also catch all of the action online through WatchESPN. Visit WatchESPN.com or download the WatchESPN app to view the game on a computer or mobile device. Dave O’Brien (play-by-play) and Doris Burke (analyst) will call the action.

Fans can also tune into their local Lady Vol Network station to catch Mickey Dearstone describing the action as Tennessee takes on the Lady Bears.

#22/25 Tennessee will take on #4/4 Baylor Sunday at 1:00pm CT in the SEC/Big 12 Challenge at Thompson-Boling Arena. «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA’s Dawn spacecraft snaps new image of Occator Crater on dwarf planet Ceres

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The brightest area on Ceres stands out amid shadowy, cratered terrain in a dramatic new view from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft, taken as it looked off to the side of the dwarf planet.

Dawn snapped this image on October 16th, from its fifth science orbit, in which the angle of the sun was different from that in previous orbits. Dawn was about 920 miles (1,480 kilometers) above Ceres when this image was taken — an altitude the spacecraft had reached in early October.

Occator Crater, home of Ceres' intriguing brightest areas, is prominently featured in this image from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

Occator Crater, home of Ceres’ intriguing brightest areas, is prominently featured in this image from NASA’s Dawn spacecraft. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

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American Heart Association recognizes role of Patient/Provider Relationships in managing Heart Failure on World Heart Day

 

American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – A doctor she’d never met walked into Cathy Aumack-Bandy’s hospital room in January 2013 and told her husband that she had severe heart failure and should get her affairs in order. She initially thought he was in the wrong room. Her next thought was that she needed to switch doctors.

“He never even addressed me,” said Aumack-Bandy, a former psychologist from Ruskin, Florida. “Prior to this heart failure diagnosis, I had been a healthy 54-year-old. Now, it felt like he was sending me home to die.”

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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NASA’s THEMIS spacecraft observes Earth’s vibrating Magnetic Field

 

Written by Lina Tran
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – The majestic auroras have captivated humans for thousands of years, but their nature – the fact that the lights are electromagnetic and respond to solar activity – was only realized in the last 150 years.

Thanks to coordinated multi-satellite observations and a worldwide network of magnetic sensors and cameras, close study of auroras has become possible over recent decades. Yet, auroras continue to mystify, dancing far above the ground to some, thus far, undetected rhythm.

An artist’s rendering (not to scale) of a cross-section of the magnetosphere, with the solar wind on the left in yellow and magnetic field lines emanating from the Earth in blue. The five THEMIS probes were well-positioned to directly observe one particular magnetic field line as it oscillated back and forth roughly every six minutes. In this unstable environment, electrons in near-Earth space, depicted as white dots, stream rapidly down magnetic field lines towards Earth’s poles. There, they interact with oxygen and nitrogen particles in the upper atmosphere, releasing photons and brightening a specific region of the aurora. (Emmanuel Masongsong/UCLA EPSS/NASA)

An artist’s rendering (not to scale) of a cross-section of the magnetosphere, with the solar wind on the left in yellow and magnetic field lines emanating from the Earth in blue. The five THEMIS probes were well-positioned to directly observe one particular magnetic field line as it oscillated back and forth roughly every six minutes. In this unstable environment, electrons in near-Earth space, depicted as white dots, stream rapidly down magnetic field lines towards Earth’s poles. There, they interact with oxygen and nitrogen particles in the upper atmosphere, releasing photons and brightening a specific region of the aurora. (Emmanuel Masongsong/UCLA EPSS/NASA)

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