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Topic: University of Illinois

NASA reports new study shows Lightening Color of Soybean Leaves may increase Growth and Yield

 

Written by Elyssia Widjaja
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory Newsroom

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A new university-led study has shown that lightening the color of soybean leaves may increase the growth and yield of this major world food crop. The finding offers a strategy to help address Earth’s future food needs.

A science team led by Donald Ort of the University of Illinois and research scientist Berkley Walker of the University of Düsseldorf, Germany, combined detailed field measurements of nearly 70 varieties of soybeans with a sophisticated model of the above-ground portion of soybean plants, developed by co-author Darren Drewry of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Lighter and darker soybeans used in the research. (UIUC/Claire Benjamin)

Lighter and darker soybeans used in the research. (UIUC/Claire Benjamin)

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More than 100 APSU freshman students inducted into Alpha Lambda Delta Honor Society

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – On Thursday, April 13th, 2017  more than 100 Austin Peay State University freshman students were inducted into the Alpha Lambda Delta (ALD) National Honor Society.

“This is the largest crowd I have seen at an induction in over a decade,”Dr. Steven Ryan, professor of languages and literature and ALD faculty advisor, said. 

 Over 100 Austin Peay State University Freshman were inducted into the the Alpha Lambda Delta (ALD) National Honor Society. (APSU)

Over 100 Austin Peay State University Freshman were inducted into the the Alpha Lambda Delta (ALD) National Honor Society. (APSU)

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American Heart Association says Statin use differs among Hispanic Adults at risk for Heart Disease

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In the United States, adults of different Hispanic/Latino backgrounds, at high risk for heart disease, varied significantly in their use of widely-prescribed cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins, according to new research in the Journal of the American Heart Association. The difference was based on whether or not they had health insurance.

“These findings have important implications for preventing disparities in cardiovascular outcomes within the growing U.S. Hispanic/Latino population,” said study lead author Dima M. Qato, Pharm.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacy systems, outcomes and policy at the University of Illinois in Chicago.

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

Prepping the patient to draw blood for a cholesterol test. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Surgeons use 3D printed model of Heart to treat patients with disorders

 

American Heart AssociationChicago, IL – An experimental 3-dimensional printed model of the heart may help surgeons treat patients born with complicated heart disorders, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2014.

Most heart surgeons use 2D images taken by X-ray, ultrasound and MRI for surgical planning. However, these images may not reveal complex structural complications in the heart’s chambers that occur when heart disease is present at birth (congenital heart defects), as opposed to developing later in life within a structurally normal heart. «Read the rest of this article»

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My Two Cents: Demetria Kalodimos celebrating thirty years in Nashville

 

My Two-Cents with Hank BonecutterClarksville, TN  When Demetria Kalodimos arrived in Nashville in 1984, little did she know that she had just landed her dream job.

This bright-eyed 23 year old, with a proud Greek heritage, from the suburbs of Chicago, was about to join one of the most storied news organizations in the business, in Nashville, Tennessee,  WSMV, Channel 4.

Now, after thirty years as one of Nashville’s most decorated journalists, she has no intention of slowing down.

Demetria Kalodimos

Demetria Kalodimos

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APSU Mens Golf’s Dustin Korte closes out college career at NCAA Golf Championship

 

Austin Peay State University Governors SportsWoodstock, GA – Austin Peay State University’s Dustin Korte finished his final round at the 2013 NCAA Men’s Golf Championship May 30th, at the Capital City Club Crabtree facility, with back-to-back birdies to card a two-over 72 for the second straight day.

APSU's Dustin Korte

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Former Austin Peay State University tennis coach to be inducted into Hall of Fame

 

Intercollegiate Tennis AssociationSkillman, New Jersey – Former Austin Peay State University tennis head coach Dennis Emery was one of seven individuals elected to the Intercollegiate Tennis Association’s (ITA) 2013 Hall of Fame class, the governing body announced last week.

Emery, the long-time coach for the Kentucky men’s program, was Austin Peay’s head coach from 1977 through 1982.

Former APSU coach Dennis Emery. Austin Peay Tennis. (Courtesy: Austin Peay Sports Information)

Former APSU coach Dennis Emery. Austin Peay Tennis. (Courtesy: Austin Peay Sports Information)

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NASA Scientists discover Ancient Bacteria existing deep within Antarctic Lake Vida

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Nearly 65 feet beneath the icy surface of a remote Antarctic lake, scientists from NASA, the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Reno, NV, the University of Illinois at Chicago, and nine other institutions, have uncovered a community of bacteria existing in one of Earth’s darkest, saltiest and coldest habitats.

Lake Vida, the largest of several unique lakes found in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, contains no oxygen, is mostly frozen and possesses the highest nitrous oxide levels of any natural water body on Earth.

Scanning electron micrograph of very small and numerous bacterial cells inhabiting icy brine channels in Antarctica’s Lake Vida, which lies in the Victoria Valley, one of the northernmost of the Antarctic dry valleys. (Credit: Christian H. Fritsen, Desert Research Institute)

Scanning electron micrograph of very small and numerous bacterial cells inhabiting icy brine channels in Antarctica’s Lake Vida, which lies in the Victoria Valley, one of the northernmost of the Antarctic dry valleys. (Credit: Christian H. Fritsen, Desert Research Institute)

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Searching for Genes To Protect Soybeans From Flooding and Diseases

 

By Don Comis, formerly with USDA’s Agricultural Research Service

Tara VanToai, retired ARS plant physiologist, and Thomas Doohan, a student at Ohio State University, collect soybean plants and root samples to analyze them for response to flooding stress. (Peggy Greb)

Tara VanToai, retired ARS plant physiologist, and Thomas Doohan, a student at Ohio State University, collect soybean plants and root samples (Peggy Greb)

USDA - U.S. Department of AgricultureSoybean varieties that grow in rice paddies in Southeast Asia could provide the United States with much-needed genes for developing soybeans tolerant to flooding—as well as to root rot and other plant diseases found in waterlogged soils.

Tara VanToai pursued the genes for these traits. She recently retired from the Agricultural Research Service’s Soil Drainage Research Unit in Columbus, Ohio.

VanToai worked with plant pathologist Anne Dorrance and soybean breeders Grover Shannon and Henry Nguyen in the search for genes that protect against both flooding and plant diseases. Dorrance is at Ohio State University’s Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center in Wooster; Shannon and Nguyen are at the University of Missouri, in Portageville and Columbia, respectively.

The team works on multiple fronts, including molecular plant breeding, with the help of DNA markers, genetic transformation, and soil management—all in an effort to protect soybeans growing on wet soils. «Read the rest of this article»

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