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United States Army to issue PT bracelet with 24/7 fitness tracking, remote mentoring

 

U.S. Army Public Affairs

U.S. ArmyWashington, D.C. – U.S. Army officials on Saturday announced it will soon field a personal fitness bracelet that will allow Army leaders to track their Soldiers’ fitness in real time.

The technology will enable Army leadership to monitor their Soldiers’ activity level, physical location, and intake of foods, liquids, and other substances. It also allows leaders to provide remote mentoring in real time, according to Dr. Duke McDirkington, the lead scientific advisor from the U.S. Army’s Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, or USARIEM, and the co-chair of the Army’s Physical Training Belt Task Force.

Army officials on Saturday announced it will soon field this personal fitness bracelet that will allow Army leaders to track their Soldiers' fitness in real time. The technology will enable Army leadership to monitor their Soldiers' activity level, physical location, and intake of foods, liquids, and other substances. (U.S. Army)

Army officials on Saturday announced it will soon field this personal fitness bracelet that will allow Army leaders to track their Soldiers’ fitness in real time. The technology will enable Army leadership to monitor their Soldiers’ activity level, physical location, and intake of foods, liquids, and other substances. (U.S. Army)

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NASA GUSTO mission to examine the Cosmic Material between Stars

 

Written by Felicia Chou
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA has selected a science mission that will measure emissions from the interstellar medium, which is the cosmic material found between stars. This data will help scientists determine the life cycle of interstellar gas in our Milky Way galaxy, witness the formation and destruction of star-forming clouds, and understand the dynamics and gas flow in the vicinity of the center of our galaxy.

The Galactic/Extragalactic ULDB Spectroscopic Terahertz Observatory (GUSTO) mission, led by principal investigator of the University of Arizona, Christopher Walker, will fly an Ultralong-Duration Balloon (ULDB) carrying a telescope with carbon, oxygen and nitrogen emission line detectors.

NASA has selected a science mission that will untangle the complexities of the interstellar medium, and map out large sections of the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud. (NASA, ESA, and Hubble Heritage Team)

NASA has selected a science mission that will untangle the complexities of the interstellar medium, and map out large sections of the plane of our Milky Way galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud. (NASA, ESA, and Hubble Heritage Team)

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NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) examines unique Merger of Galaxies

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A supermassive black hole inside a tiny galaxy is challenging scientists’ ideas about what happens when two galaxies become one.

Was 49 is the name of a system consisting of a large disk galaxy, referred to as Was 49a, merging with a much smaller “dwarf” galaxy called Was 49b. The dwarf galaxy rotates within the larger galaxy’s disk, about 26,000 light-years from its center.

Thanks to NASA’s Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) mission, scientists have discovered that the dwarf galaxy is so luminous in high-energy X-rays, it must host a supermassive black hole much larger and more powerful than expected.

This optical image shows the Was 49 system, which consists of a large disk galaxy, Was 49a, merging with a much smaller "dwarf" galaxy Was 49b. (DCT/NRL)

This optical image shows the Was 49 system, which consists of a large disk galaxy, Was 49a, merging with a much smaller “dwarf” galaxy Was 49b. (DCT/NRL)

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NASA prepares for future Satellite by studying Coral Reefs of Hawaii

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA pulled off a scientific double play in Hawaii this winter, using the same instruments and aircraft to study both volcanoes and coral reefs. Besides helping scientists understand these two unique environments better, the data will be used to evaluate the possibility of preparing a potential future NASA satellite that would monitor ecosystem changes and natural hazards.

The advantages of studying active volcanoes from the air rather than the ground are obvious. Coral reefs may not offer the same risks in a close encounter that volcanoes do, but there’s another good reason to study them by remote sensing: they’re dotted across thousands of square miles of the globe.

NASA coral reef studies in Hawaii this winter will help scientists understand this unique environment. (NOAA)

NASA coral reef studies in Hawaii this winter will help scientists understand this unique environment. (NOAA)

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APSU senior Thomas Murphy finishes accomplished undergraduate tenure with Washington D.C. internship

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – A common regret recent college graduates share is that they wish they had not let opportunity pass by them.

It’s a complaint that takes a lot of forms — some wish they had studied abroad, others wish they joined a campus club and still more wish they had taken that internship opportunity — but you would not be alone in wishing you had said “yes” more often during your college years.

Austin Peay State University student Thomas Murphy

Austin Peay State University student Thomas Murphy

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Fort Campbell’s Intrepid Spirit Center tackles Traumatic Brain Injuries

 

Written by Leejay Lockhart
Fort Campbell Public Affairs Office

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionFort Campbell, KY – Since Fort Campbell’s Intrepid Spirit Center opened more than two years ago, it has allowed staff to take a multidisciplinary approach to treating traumatic brain injuries and associated conditions.

The center consolidates many different specialties under one roof to optimize the efficiency of the treatment offered to patients. Elsewhere, the National Intrepid Center of Excellence close to Washington, other similar centers such as the one at Fort Hood, along with centers operated by the Navy and Marine Corps all have the same treatment philosophy as Fort Campbell’s Intrepid Spirit Center.

The Intrepid Spirit Center is using the heightened awareness about brain injuries during the Brain Injury Awareness Month observances in March to increase education about TBI on Fort Campbell.

Charles Brill, a physician’s assistant who works at the Fort Campbell Intrepid Spirit Center, uses acupuncture to relieve a patient’s pain March 20, 2017. After inserting all of the needles, Brill will use a small amount of electricity to stimulate the needles, which often results in lowered chronic pain for patients at the center, which uses a multidisciplinary approach to treat traumatic brain injuries. (Leejay Lockhart, Fort Campbell Public Affairs Office)

Charles Brill, a physician’s assistant who works at the Fort Campbell Intrepid Spirit Center, uses acupuncture to relieve a patient’s pain March 20, 2017. After inserting all of the needles, Brill will use a small amount of electricity to stimulate the needles, which often results in lowered chronic pain for patients at the center, which uses a multidisciplinary approach to treat traumatic brain injuries. (Leejay Lockhart, Fort Campbell Public Affairs Office)

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NASA picks 10 Studies for future CubeSat missions

 

Written by Andrew Good
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA has selected 10 studies under the Planetary Science Deep Space SmallSat Studies (PSDS3) program to develop mission concepts using small satellites to investigate Venus, Earth’s moon, asteroids, Mars and the outer planets.

For these studies, small satellites are defined as less than 180 kilograms in mass (about 400 pounds). CubeSats are built to standard specifications of 1 unit (U), which is equal to about 4x4x4 inches (10x10x10 centimeters). They often are launched into orbit as auxiliary payloads, significantly reducing costs.

A global view of Venus created from Magellan data and a computer-simulated globe. A JPL-led mission concept study was recently selected to study Venus using a Cubesat. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

A global view of Venus created from Magellan data and a computer-simulated globe. A JPL-led mission concept study was recently selected to study Venus using a Cubesat. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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Marsha Blackburn: This Week From Washington – March 26th, 2017

 

Congressman Marsha Blackburn

7th District of Tennessee

U.S. CongressWashington, D.C. – Spring Break is always one of my favorite times of year as we often get the chance to see so many of you in our office.

It’s been a pleasure to welcome families from across the 7th District to the Capitol this week.

If you are planning a trip to Washington, please remember that we can assist with Capitol and White House tours.

Marsha Blackburn Visits with Constituents on Spring Break

Marsha Blackburn Visits with Constituents on Spring Break

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NASA’s Dawn mission reveals Ceres’ Ice in Shadowed Craters related to dwarf planet’s tilt

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Dwarf planet Ceres may be hundreds of millions of miles from Jupiter, and even farther from Saturn, but the tremendous influence of gravity from these gas giants has an appreciable effect on Ceres’ orientation.

In a new study, researchers from NASA’s Dawn mission calculate that the axial tilt of Ceres — the angle at which it spins as it journeys around the sun — varies widely over the course of about 24,500 years. Astronomers consider this to be a surprisingly short period of time for such dramatic deviations.

This animation shows how the illumination of Ceres' northern hemisphere varies with the dwarf planet's axial tilt, or obliquity. Shadowed regions are highlighted for tilts of 2 degrees, 12 degrees and 20 degrees. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

This animation shows how the illumination of Ceres’ northern hemisphere varies with the dwarf planet’s axial tilt, or obliquity. Shadowed regions are highlighted for tilts of 2 degrees, 12 degrees and 20 degrees. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA)

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NASA says Rosetta images show active surface on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

 

Written by DC Agle
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Images returned from the European Space Agency’s Rosetta mission indicate that during its most recent trip through the inner solar system, the surface of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko was a very active place – full of growing fractures, collapsing cliffs and massive rolling boulders.

Moving material buried some features on the comet’s surface while exhuming others. A study on 67P’s changing surface was released Tuesday, March 21st, in the journal Science.

A 100 foot-wide (30 meter), 28-million-pound (12.8-million-kilogram) boulder, was found to have moved 460 feet (140 meters) on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in the lead up to perihelion in August 2015, when the comet's activity was at its highest. (ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

A 100 foot-wide (30 meter), 28-million-pound (12.8-million-kilogram) boulder, was found to have moved 460 feet (140 meters) on comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in the lead up to perihelion in August 2015, when the comet’s activity was at its highest. (ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA)

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