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American Heart Association reports Higher Waist and Hip measures may add up to greater risk for Heart Attack among Women

 

Journal of the American Heart Association Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Higher waist and hip size are more strongly associated with heart attack risk than overall obesity, especially among women, according to research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

In a study of nearly 500,000 adults (aged 40-69) from the United Kingdom, researchers found that while general obesity and obesity specifically around the abdomen each have profound harmful effects on heart attack risk in both sexes, women were more negatively impacted by higher waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio than men.

Woman getting a waist measurement. (American Heart Association)

Woman getting a waist measurement. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Mental Stress-Induced constricted blood vessels more likely in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – In women with heart disease, constriction of peripheral vessels during mental stress affects the heart circulation more than men’s, potentially raising women’s risk of heart-related events and death, according to new research in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, an American Heart Association journal.

In most people, mental stress causes peripheral vessels to constrict. In people with heart disease, this effect can cause a reduction in blood supply to the heart muscle called “ischemia.”

Woman in Stress

Woman in Stress

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Sleep deprivation may increase risk of cardiovascular disease in older women

 

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Older women who don’t get enough sleep were more likely to have poor cardiovascular health, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

In the new study, researchers considered sleeping at least two hours more during the weekend than on the weekday as a sign of being in sleep debt.

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

Sleeping woman. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Stressful Events can increase Women’s Odds of Obesity

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationAnaheim, CA – Women who experienced one or more traumatic lifetime events or several negative events in recent years had higher odds of being obese than women who didn’t report such stress, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians.

Women who reported four or more negative events in the last five years, such as unemployed though wanting work, had increased odds of obesity.

Women who reported four or more negative events in the last five years, such as unemployed though wanting work, had increased odds of obesity.

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More Physical Activity and Higher Intensity Physical Activity may significantly reduce Risk of Death in Older Women in the short term

 

Circulation Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – More physical activity and at higher intensities could lead to a big drop in the risk of death in older women from any cause, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Researchers found the volume of light intensity physical activity or sedentary behavior was not associated with death rate. However, light intensity activity may be beneficial for other health outcomes not studied in this research.

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

Moderate to vigorous exercise, like brisk walking, cut the risk of death up to 70 percent among older women. Source: Circulation, November 6th, 2017, Accelerometer-Measured Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to All-Cause Mortality. (American Heart Association)

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Tennessee Department of Health says Talk with your Health Care Provider about Breast Cancer Screening, Rick Factors

 

Tennessee Department of HealthNashville, TN – Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in women in the United States.

With nearly 4,700 new cases of breast cancer diagnosed in Tennessee every year, the Tennessee Department of Health encourages residents to talk with a health care provider on when to schedule their annual mammograms. Mammography screening should begin no later than age 50.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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Dodging the Roadkill: The Center Of Attention

 

Dodging the Roadkill - A Biker's JourneyClarksville, TN – I can only speak for myself when I say that one of prime reasons for owning a motorcycle is it’s image.  Good or bad, the motorcycle has always represented the “coolest of cools,” and the “baddest of bads.”

Marlon Brando, Peter Fonda, James Dean and my all time favorite, Steve McQueen, made the motorcycle the icon it is today.  You can’t deny that sitting on the back of a motorcycle and cruising through town, or pulling into the parking lot, is an amazing feeling.

I’m not saying that I AM the coolest thing on two wheels, I’m just saying that in my mind, the ability to own a bike, ride a bike and represent the culture in some way, IS the coolest thing going.

Dodging the Roadkill

Dodging the Roadkill

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In spite of extraordinary progress, more needs to be done to save Women from Heart Disease, says American Heart Association CEO

 

American Heart AssociationWashington, D.C.American Heart Association CEO Nancy Brown and co-author of the study “Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs Regarding Cardiovascular Disease in Women” published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, issued the following comments:

“Cardiovascular diseases cause 1 in 3 deaths among women each year – more than all cancers combined. That’s why the American Heart Association first brought this critical issue to light through the creation of the Go Red For Women™ movement in 2004.”

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

Nancy Brown; Chief Executive Officer, American Heart Association

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American Heart Association says Yogurt may protect Women from developing High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Women who ate five or more servings of yogurt per week had a lower risk of developing high blood pressure compared to those who rarely ate yogurt, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“No one food is a magic bullet but adding yogurt to an otherwise healthy diet seems to help reduce the long-term risk of high blood pressure in women,” said Justin Buendia, lead author of the study and a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts.

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Violence linked to early signs of Blood Vessel Disease in Women

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Experiencing physical violence in adulthood may increase the risk of women developing heart and blood-vessel disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“Both society and the healthcare sector need to be aware of the importance of exposure to violence and its impact, not only on social well-being, but also on women’s long-term health,” said Mario Flores, M.D., study lead author and research assistant at the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico City, Mexico.

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

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