Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: women

American Heart Association says Yogurt may protect Women from developing High Blood Pressure

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Women who ate five or more servings of yogurt per week had a lower risk of developing high blood pressure compared to those who rarely ate yogurt, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“No one food is a magic bullet but adding yogurt to an otherwise healthy diet seems to help reduce the long-term risk of high blood pressure in women,” said Justin Buendia, lead author of the study and a Ph.D. candidate at Boston University School of Medicine in Boston, Massachusetts.

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

Yogurt LowFat plain in cup with spoon verticle. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Violence linked to early signs of Blood Vessel Disease in Women

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPhoenix, AZ – Experiencing physical violence in adulthood may increase the risk of women developing heart and blood-vessel disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology/Lifestyle 2016 Scientific Sessions.

“Both society and the healthcare sector need to be aware of the importance of exposure to violence and its impact, not only on social well-being, but also on women’s long-term health,” said Mario Flores, M.D., study lead author and research assistant at the National Institute of Public Health in Mexico City, Mexico.

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

Blood flow blocked in brain. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says a Woman’s Heart Attack Causes, Symptoms may differ from a Man’s

 

American Heart Association Scientific Statement

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A woman’s heart attack may have different underlying causes, symptoms and outcomes compared to men, and differences in risk factors and outcomes are further pronounced in black and Hispanic women, according to a scientific statement published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The statement is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on heart attacks in women.

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


American Heart Association says the No. 1 Killer is Invisible to most Women

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationOrlando, FL – Even though heart disease and stroke are the No. 1 killer of women in the U.S., most women say they don’t have a personal connection to cardiovascular disease, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2015.

A 2014 nationally representative survey of 1,011 adult women found that those who know another woman with heart disease are 25 percent more likely to be concerned about it for themselves and 19 percent more likely to bring up heart health with their doctors. The survey was developed and conducted by the Women’s Heart Alliance.

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

Heart illustration with artery close up. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association report shows Young Women less likely to be prescribed or take post-heart attack medication

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Young women are less likely than young men to be prescribed or to fill their medication after a heart attack, according to new research published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

It is recommended that both male and female heart attack survivors take ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers and statins to prevent another heart attack. Yet studies have documented that rates of medication use to prevent a recurrent heart attack are lower among women than men.

Women under the age of 55 are significantly less likely to be taking optimal medication one year after a heart attack.

Women under the age of 55 are significantly less likely to be taking optimal medication one year after a heart attack.

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association says Young Adults, Women experience only slight declines in Heart Disease Deaths

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Deaths from heart disease have declined dramatically over the last few decades but young people, particularly women, are not sharing equally in that improvement, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Using data on adults age 25 and older, researchers tracked annual percentage changes in heart disease death rates between three time periods: 1979-1989, 1990-1999 and 2000-2011. Death rates in adults 65 and over declined consistently over the decades, with accelerating improvements since 2000.

Improvements in death rates have slowed in people under age 55, particularly among women. (Amiercan Heart Association)

Improvements in death rates have slowed in people under age 55, particularly among women. (Amiercan Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Uric Acid may lessen Women’s Disability after Stroke

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Uric acid – a chemical at high levels can lead to serious illness – may lessen women’s disability after stroke, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

High levels of uric acid can lead to kidney stones or the inflammatory arthritic condition known as gout and is linked with heart and vascular problems and diabetes.

FAST Stroke infographic. (American Heart Association) «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | 1 Comment »
 


American Heart Association says Living near major roads may increase risk of Sudden Cardiac Death in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Living close to a major road may increase women’s risk of dying from sudden cardiac death, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

“It’s important for healthcare providers to recognize that environmental exposures may be under-appreciated risk factors for diseases such as sudden cardiac death and fatal coronary heart disease,” said Jaime E. Hart, Sc.D., study lead author and an instructor in medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, Massachusetts. “On a population level, living near a major roadway was as important a risk factor as smoking, diet or obesity.”

Living near a major road was associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death in women. (American Heart Association)

Living near a major road was associated with an increased risk of sudden cardiac death in women. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association reports Gender-specific research improves accuracy of Heart Disease Diagnosis in Women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Diagnosing coronary heart disease in women has become more accurate through gender-specific research that clarifies the role of both obstructive and non-obstructive coronary artery disease as contributors to ischemic heart disease in women, according to a new statement published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

YouTube Preview Image «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

American Heart Association sets first guidelines for reducing stroke risks unique to women

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – For the first time, guidelines have been developed for preventing stroke in women.

“If you are a woman, you share many of the same risk factors for stroke with men, but your risk is also influenced by hormones, reproductive health, pregnancy, childbirth and other sex-related factors,” said Cheryl Bushnell, M.D., M.H.S., author of the new scientific statement published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

Blood Pressure Check. (American Heart Association)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 


Page 1 of 3123

Personal Controls

Archives

    May 2016
    S M T W T F S
    « Apr    
    1234567
    891011121314
    15161718192021
    22232425262728
    293031