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Are Bare Bellies, Too Tight Jeans and Visible Underwear Women’s Only Choices?

 

At the risk of being a person living in a glass house with plenty of people who could throw stones at my way of dressing, I have decided to tackle a ticklish subject—women’s attire for summer. As hot weather begins to envelope us, we females need to stop and think before we select the outfits in which we are viewed in public.

Please be aware that I am not setting myself up as any kind of role model in the fashion world. I am a dumpy, past middle-age female whose figure has long since gone to flab. I need to lose at least another 20 pounds and have no defense when it comes to trying to camouflage my ungainly rolls of excess flesh. My wardrobe does little to hide my worst figure fault, evidence of my love of eating—the midlife bulge!

That being said, I shall now try to address a few of the less-than-lovely fashion statements of my fellow females.

First, let’s look at the too short shirt—or rather, let’s not. Seeing a young girl’s flat belly is a delight to most men, I would assume. Seeing many pounds of excess flab in that area is a serious turnoff—for anyone! I mean, if you think seeing a fat gut is obscene, think of being exposed in public to a region usually covered by panties. Aaaaaugh!!!!

Then we have the size 12 girls poured into jeans that came off a size 2 body. I’m sure they are in pain—and so are the rest of us when we have to look at them. Even worse are the “two cats fighting in a burlap sack” rears of overweight women in spandex. Please! Spare the world this horror!

Recently I saw a woman older than I am (believe me, you don’t want to even think about it!) who was wearing a camisole cut down to a region near her navel. The wrinkles above this material were similar to a rhino hide. I know it’s hot, but, ladies of a senior disposition, please remember that modesty is a virtue. We really don’t need to see your lingerie (or your sadly sunken parts) even if it is “in style.” Give the rest of us a break!

Now we come to large ladies who insist on wearing wide striped attire. My husband claims that this adds at least 20 pounds to any woman’s appearance. Stripes that go up and down are slimming, you know. They give you height, not weight. Think about it when you’re buying your next shirt or dress. Designers are people who are interested in selling clothes, not necessarily in helping you look your best. Just because it’s on the rack, it’s not necessarily your best choice.

Then we have the low-waisted pants and skirts. These are made for stick figures with the emphasis on the lack of any visible excess from head to toe. Keep it in mind if you decide to take one of these garments home—and even more so, if you plan to wear it!

If you want to look slimmer, you can wear the same color, top and bottom. Dark colors take off visible weight too. However, in the summer light colors reflect the heat and feel cooler. You may have to leave dark colors for cooler days.

We don’t even have to think about short, short shorts. Daisy Duke, we’re not!

The best fashion sense happens when you look in a full-length mirror, preferably a three-way full-length mirror. If you think you look silly in that outfit, you’re probably right. (Not to mention that if you have to ask someone if this “makes my butt look bigger,” you already know the answer!)


About Sue Freeman Culverhouse

    Sue Freeman Culverhouse

    Author of Tennessee Literary Luminaries: From Cormac McCarthy to Robert Penn Warren (The History Press, 2013) Sue Freeman Culverhouse has been a freelance writer for the past 36 years. Beginning in 1976, she published magazines articles in Americana, Historic Preservation, American Horticulturist, Flower and Garden, The Albemarle Magazine, and many others. Sue is the winner of two Virginia Press Awards in writing.

    She moved to Springfield, Tennessee in 2003 with her sculptor husband, Bill a retired attorney. Sue has one daughter,  Susan Leigh Miller who teaches poetry and creative writing at Rutgers University.

    Sue teaches music and writing at Watauga Elementary School in Ridgetop, Tennessee to approximately 500 students in kindergarten through fifth grade. She also publishes a literary magazine each year; all work in the magazine is written and illustrated by the students.

    Sue writes “Uncommon Sense,” a column in the Robertson County Times, which also appears on Clarksville Online. She is the author of “Seven keys to a sucessful life”, which is  available on amazon.com and pubishamerica.com; this is a self-help book for all ages.

    Web Site: http://culverhouseart.com/
    Email: cuverhouse@comcast.net

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