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Home A “seismic hotspot” map produced using the NASA-funded, UC-Davis-led forecast method. The colored areas (hotspots) are determined by computing the increase in potential for large (greater than magnitude 5.0) earthquakes. Research has shown this procedure locates areas (hotspots) that are sensitive to earthquake events greater than magnitude 5.0 that will occur over approximately the next 10 years. (Credit: UC Davis) A "seismic hotspot" map produced using the NASA-funded, UC-Davis-led forecast method. The colored areas (hotspots) are determined by computing the increase in potential for large (greater than magnitude 5.0) earthquakes. Research has shown this procedure locates areas (hotspots) that are sensitive to earthquake events greater than magnitude 5.0 that will occur over approximately the next 10 years. (Credit: UC Davis)

A “seismic hotspot” map produced using the NASA-funded, UC-Davis-led forecast method. The colored areas (hotspots) are determined by computing the increase in potential for large (greater than magnitude 5.0) earthquakes. Research has shown this procedure locates areas (hotspots) that are sensitive to earthquake events greater than magnitude 5.0 that will occur over approximately the next 10 years. (Credit: UC Davis)

A "seismic hotspot" map produced using the NASA-funded, UC-Davis-led forecast method. The colored areas (hotspots) are determined by computing the increase in potential for large (greater than magnitude 5.0) earthquakes. Research has shown this procedure locates areas (hotspots) that are sensitive to earthquake events greater than magnitude 5.0 that will occur over approximately the next 10 years. (Credit: UC Davis)

A “seismic hotspot” map produced using the NASA-funded, UC-Davis-led forecast method. The colored areas (hotspots) are determined by computing the increase in potential for large (greater than magnitude 5.0) earthquakes. Research has shown this procedure locates areas (hotspots) that are sensitive to earthquake events greater than magnitude 5.0 that will occur over approximately the next 10 years. (Credit: UC Davis)