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Home These two natural color views taken 11 hours — one Saturn day — apart by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft help scientists measure wind speeds in the huge storm seen here in the planet’s northern hemisphere. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute) These two natural color views taken 11 hours -- one Saturn day -- apart by NASA's Cassini spacecraft help scientists measure wind speeds in the huge storm seen here in the planet's northern hemisphere. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

These two natural color views taken 11 hours — one Saturn day — apart by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft help scientists measure wind speeds in the huge storm seen here in the planet’s northern hemisphere. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

These two natural color views taken 11 hours -- one Saturn day -- apart by NASA's Cassini spacecraft help scientists measure wind speeds in the huge storm seen here in the planet's northern hemisphere. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

These two natural color views taken 11 hours — one Saturn day — apart by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft help scientists measure wind speeds in the huge storm seen here in the planet’s northern hemisphere. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)

This false-color mosaic from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft shows the tail of Saturn’s huge northern storm. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)
The largest storm to ravage Saturn in decades started as a small spot seen in this image from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on Dec. 5th, 2010 — the same day Cassini also detected frequent lightning signals. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute)