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Wednesday, August 17, 2022
Home Astronomers have uncovered patterns of light that appear to be from the first stars and galaxies that formed in the universe. The light patterns were hidden within a strip of sky observed by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC) Astronomers have uncovered patterns of light that appear to be from the first stars and galaxies that formed in the universe. The light patterns were hidden within a strip of sky observed by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC)

Astronomers have uncovered patterns of light that appear to be from the first stars and galaxies that formed in the universe. The light patterns were hidden within a strip of sky observed by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC)

Astronomers have uncovered patterns of light that appear to be from the first stars and galaxies that formed in the universe. The light patterns were hidden within a strip of sky observed by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC)

Astronomers have uncovered patterns of light that appear to be from the first stars and galaxies that formed in the universe. The light patterns were hidden within a strip of sky observed by NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC)

The structure of the lower panel matches just what we would expect for the patterns of clusters for the first galaxies formed in the universe. Even though any particular early galaxy would be too faint to see individually, this technique allows astronomers to better understand what things were like shortly after the Big Bang.