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Saturday, January 28, 2023
Home This chart locates the star Kappa Andromedae, which is visible to the unaided eye from suburban skies. (Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/DSS) This chart locates the star Kappa Andromedae, which is visible to the unaided eye from suburban skies. (Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/DSS)

This chart locates the star Kappa Andromedae, which is visible to the unaided eye from suburban skies. (Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/DSS)

This chart locates the star Kappa Andromedae, which is visible to the unaided eye from suburban skies. (Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/DSS)

This chart locates the star Kappa Andromedae, which is visible to the unaided eye from suburban skies. (Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/DSS)

This false-color near-infrared image has been processed to remove most of the scattered light from the star Kappa Andromedae (masked out at center). The “super-Jupiter” companion, Kappa Andromedae b (upper left), lies at a projected distance of about 55 times the average distance between Earth and the sun and about 1.8 times farther than Neptune, whose orbit is shown for comparison (dashed circle). The white region marking the companion indicates a signal present in all near-infrared wavelengths, while colored blobs represent residual noise. The Subaru Telescope in Hawaii captured the image in July. (Credit: NOAJ/Subaru/J. Carson, College of Charleston)