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Home The study launched 10 flights between March 11-14, 2013, into the volcanic plume and along the rim of the Turrialba summit crater approx. 10,500 feet above sea level. (Image credit: NASA/ Matthew Fladeland) The study launched 10 flights between March 11-14, 2013, into the volcanic plume and along the rim of the Turrialba summit crater approx. 10,500 feet above sea level. (Image credit: NASA/ Matthew Fladeland)

The study launched 10 flights between March 11-14, 2013, into the volcanic plume and along the rim of the Turrialba summit crater approx. 10,500 feet above sea level. (Image credit: NASA/ Matthew Fladeland)

The study launched 10 flights between March 11-14, 2013, into the volcanic plume and along the rim of the Turrialba summit crater approx. 10,500 feet above sea level. (Image credit: NASA/ Matthew Fladeland)

The study launched 10 flights between March 11-14, 2013, into the volcanic plume and along the rim of the Turrialba summit crater approx. 10,500 feet above sea level. (Image credit: NASA/ Matthew Fladeland)

NASA researchers modified three repurposed Aerovironment RQ-14 Dragon Eye unmanned aerial vehicles acquired from the United States Marine Corps to study the sulfur dioxide plume of Costa Rica’s Turrialba volcano. The project is designed to improve the remote sensing capability of satellites and computer models of volcanic activity. (Image credit: Google/NASA/Matthew Fladeland)
Ames research scientist Rick Kolyer launches Dragon Eye UAV. (Image credit: NASA/ Matthew Fladeland)