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Home The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA’s Terra spacecraft views every scene it observes from nine different angles. This unique design allows it to measure the height of smoke plumes using stereoscopic techniques. This MISR image, acquired Aug. 23, 2013, shows a 121-by-165-mile (194-by-266 kilometer) portion of the scene, where the smoke is the thickest. (Image credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team) The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft views every scene it observes from nine different angles. This unique design allows it to measure the height of smoke plumes using stereoscopic techniques. This MISR image, acquired Aug. 23, 2013, shows a 121-by-165-mile (194-by-266 kilometer) portion of the scene, where the smoke is the thickest. (Image credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team)

The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA’s Terra spacecraft views every scene it observes from nine different angles. This unique design allows it to measure the height of smoke plumes using stereoscopic techniques. This MISR image, acquired Aug. 23, 2013, shows a 121-by-165-mile (194-by-266 kilometer) portion of the scene, where the smoke is the thickest. (Image credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team)

The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA's Terra spacecraft views every scene it observes from nine different angles. This unique design allows it to measure the height of smoke plumes using stereoscopic techniques. This MISR image, acquired Aug. 23, 2013, shows a 121-by-165-mile (194-by-266 kilometer) portion of the scene, where the smoke is the thickest. (Image credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team)

The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA’s Terra spacecraft views every scene it observes from nine different angles. This unique design allows it to measure the height of smoke plumes using stereoscopic techniques. This MISR image, acquired Aug. 23, 2013, shows a 121-by-165-mile (194-by-266 kilometer) portion of the scene, where the smoke is the thickest. (Image credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team)

Visible image of California’s Rim Fire acquired Aug. 23rd, 2013 by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA’s Terra spacecraft, showing extensive, brownish smoke. The imaged area measures 236 by 215 miles (380 by 346 kilometers). (Image credit: NASA/GSFC/LaRC/JPL, MISR Team)
The plume of carbon monoxide pollution from the Rim Fire burning in and near Yosemite National Park, Calif., is visible in this Aug. 26, 2013 image from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua spacecraft. The image shows a three-day running average of daily measurements of carbon monoxide present at an altitude of 18,000 feet (5.5 kilometers). (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)