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American Heart Association recognizes role of Patient/Provider Relationships in managing Heart Failure on World Heart Day

 

American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – A doctor she’d never met walked into Cathy Aumack-Bandy’s hospital room in January 2013 and told her husband that she had severe heart failure and should get her affairs in order. She initially thought he was in the wrong room. Her next thought was that she needed to switch doctors.

“He never even addressed me,” said Aumack-Bandy, a former psychologist from Ruskin, Florida. “Prior to this heart failure diagnosis, I had been a healthy 54-year-old. Now, it felt like he was sending me home to die.”

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

Heart Illustration. (American Heart Association)

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NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover discovers evidence that Mars Surface Material contributes to Atmosphere

 

Written by Elizabeth Zubritsky
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Curiosity rover has found evidence that chemistry in the surface material on Mars contributed dynamically to the makeup of its atmosphere over time. It’s another clue that the history of the Red Planet’s atmosphere is more complex and interesting than a simple legacy of loss.

The findings come from the rover’s Sample Analysis at Mars, or SAM, instrument suite, which studied the gases xenon and krypton in Mars’ atmosphere. The two gases can be used as tracers to help scientists investigate the evolution and erosion of the Martian atmosphere.

Processes in Mars' surface material can explain why particular xenon (Xe) and krypton (Kr) isotopes are more abundant in the Martian atmosphere than expected, as measured by NASA's Curiosity rover. Cosmic rays striking barium (Ba) or bromine (Br) atoms can alter isotopic ratios of xenon and krypton. (NASA/GSFC/JPL-Caltech)

Processes in Mars’ surface material can explain why particular xenon (Xe) and krypton (Kr) isotopes are more abundant in the Martian atmosphere than expected, as measured by NASA’s Curiosity rover. Cosmic rays striking barium (Ba) or bromine (Br) atoms can alter isotopic ratios of xenon and krypton. (NASA/GSFC/JPL-Caltech)

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