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Home NASA’s SMAP radiometer instrument measured Hurricane Matthew’s wind speeds at 4:52 a.m. PDT (7:52 a.m. EDT) at up to 132 miles per hour (59 meters per second). SMAP has excellent sensitivity to extreme winds, far beyond that of typical scatterometer instruments now in orbit. (NASA/JPL-Caltech) NASA’s SMAP radiometer instrument measured Hurricane Matthew’s wind speeds at 4:52 a.m. PDT (7:52 a.m. EDT) at up to 132 miles per hour (59 meters per second). SMAP has excellent sensitivity to extreme winds, far beyond that of typical scatterometer instruments now in orbit. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

NASA’s SMAP radiometer instrument measured Hurricane Matthew’s wind speeds at 4:52 a.m. PDT (7:52 a.m. EDT) at up to 132 miles per hour (59 meters per second). SMAP has excellent sensitivity to extreme winds, far beyond that of typical scatterometer instruments now in orbit. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

NASA’s SMAP radiometer instrument measured Hurricane Matthew’s wind speeds at 4:52 a.m. PDT (7:52 a.m. EDT) at up to 132 miles per hour (59 meters per second). SMAP has excellent sensitivity to extreme winds, far beyond that of typical scatterometer instruments now in orbit. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

NASA’s SMAP radiometer instrument measured Hurricane Matthew’s wind speeds at 4:52 a.m. PDT (7:52 a.m. EDT) at up to 132 miles per hour (59 meters per second). SMAP has excellent sensitivity to extreme winds, far beyond that of typical scatterometer instruments now in orbit. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

NASA’s CloudSat flew east of Hurricane Matthew’s center on Oct. 6 at 11:30 a.m. PDT (2:30 p.m. EDT), intersecting parts of Matthew’s outer rain bands and revealing Matthew’s anvil clouds (thick cirrus cloud cover), with cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds beneath (lower image). Reds/pinks are larger water/ice droplets. (NASA/JPL/The Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere (CIRA), Colorado State University)
At 11:29 p.m. PDT on Oct. 6 (2:29 a.m. EDT on Oct. 7), NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument on NASA’s Aqua satellite produced this false-color infrared image of Matthew as the storm moved up Florida’s central coast. The image shows the temperature of Matthew’s cloud tops or the surface of Earth in cloud-free regions, with the most intense thunderstorms shown in purples and blues. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)