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Wednesday, February 1, 2023
Home When the moon’s orbit around Earth lines up on the same plane as Earth’s orbit around the sun, its shadow is cast across the planet. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein) When the moon’s orbit around Earth lines up on the same plane as Earth’s orbit around the sun, its shadow is cast across the planet. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein)

When the moon’s orbit around Earth lines up on the same plane as Earth’s orbit around the sun, its shadow is cast across the planet. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein)

When the moon’s orbit around Earth lines up on the same plane as Earth’s orbit around the sun, its shadow is cast across the planet. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein)

When the moon’s orbit around Earth lines up on the same plane as Earth’s orbit around the sun, its shadow is cast across the planet. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein)

When the moon falls completely in Earth’s shadow, a total lunar eclipse occurs. Only light travelling through Earth’s atmosphere, which is bent into the planet’s shadow, is reflected off the moon, giving it a reddish hue. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/Genna Duberstein)