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Saturday, August 13, 2022
Home It’s nearly impossible to compare the apparent size of the supermoon with a micromoon from memory, but when seen side-by-side as in this graphic, it becomes clear. (NASA/JPL-Caltech) It's nearly impossible to compare the apparent size of the supermoon with a micromoon from memory, but when seen side-by-side as in this graphic, it becomes clear. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

It’s nearly impossible to compare the apparent size of the supermoon with a micromoon from memory, but when seen side-by-side as in this graphic, it becomes clear. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

It's nearly impossible to compare the apparent size of the supermoon with a micromoon from memory, but when seen side-by-side as in this graphic, it becomes clear. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

It’s nearly impossible to compare the apparent size of the supermoon with a micromoon from memory, but when seen side-by-side as in this graphic, it becomes clear. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

A supermoon looks bigger than a “micromoon” (when the full moon is at apogee) because it’s about 40,000 kilometers closer to Earth on average. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)