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American Heart Association says Less than One in 100 Stroke Survivors meet Heart Health Goals

 

American Heart AssociationLos Angeles, CA – Fewer than one in 100 stroke survivors meet all of Life’s Simple 7 goals for ideal cardiovascular health identified by the American Heart Association.

Moreover, the proportion who fail to meet almost all of the criteria is on the rise, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.

Learn to Protect Your Heart and Your Brain with Life’s Simple 7 at www.heart.org/mylifecheck Unhealthy behaviors can lead to narrowing of the blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the brain and potentially leading to hardening of the arteries of the heart and the brain. My Life Check - Life's Simple 7. (American Heart Association)

Learn to Protect Your Heart and Your Brain with Life’s Simple 7 at www.heart.org/mylifecheck Unhealthy behaviors can lead to narrowing of the blood vessels, reducing blood flow to the brain and potentially leading to hardening of the arteries of the heart and the brain. My Life Check – Life’s Simple 7. (American Heart Association)

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NASA Optics Experts close to developing Telescope that can search far off Planets for Life

 

Written by Lori Keesey
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD –  Optics Experts Measure to Picometer Accuracy — a NASA First.

NASA optics experts are well on the way to toppling a barrier that has thwarted scientists from achieving a long-held ambition: building an ultra-stable telescope that locates and images dozens of Earth-like planets beyond the solar system and then scrutinizes their atmospheres for signs of life. 

Babak Saif and Lee Feinberg at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, have shown for the first time that they can dynamically detect subatomic- or picometer-sized distortions — changes that are far smaller than an atom — across a five-foot segmented telescope mirror and its support structure.

Goddard optics experts Babak Saif (left) and Lee Feinberg (right), with help from engineer Eli Griff-McMahon an employee of Genesis, have created an Ultra-Stable Thermal Vacuum system that they will use to make picometer-level measurements. (NASA/W. Hrybyk)

Goddard optics experts Babak Saif (left) and Lee Feinberg (right), with help from engineer Eli Griff-McMahon an employee of Genesis, have created an Ultra-Stable Thermal Vacuum system that they will use to make picometer-level measurements. (NASA/W. Hrybyk)

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