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Wednesday, August 17, 2022
Home This artist’s rendering shows the twin spacecraft of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, which will continue the original GRACE mission’s legacy of tracking fluctuations in Earth’s gravity field to detect changes in mass, including in ice sheets and aquifers. (NASA/JPL-Caltech) This artist's rendering shows the twin spacecraft of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, which will continue the original GRACE mission's legacy of tracking fluctuations in Earth's gravity field to detect changes in mass, including in ice sheets and aquifers. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This artist’s rendering shows the twin spacecraft of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, which will continue the original GRACE mission’s legacy of tracking fluctuations in Earth’s gravity field to detect changes in mass, including in ice sheets and aquifers. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This artist's rendering shows the twin spacecraft of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, which will continue the original GRACE mission's legacy of tracking fluctuations in Earth's gravity field to detect changes in mass, including in ice sheets and aquifers. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This artist’s rendering shows the twin spacecraft of the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, which will continue the original GRACE mission’s legacy of tracking fluctuations in Earth’s gravity field to detect changes in mass, including in ice sheets and aquifers. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

In 2018, NASA is scheduled to launch two new satellite missions and conduct an array of field research that will enhance our view of Earth’s ice sheets, glaciers, sea ice, snow cover, and permafrost. Collectively, these frozen regions are known as the “cryosphere.” (NASA)