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Sunday, August 14, 2022
Home This image shows the sunlit side of Earth, observed in 10 wavelengths by the EPIC instrument aboard the DSCOVR satellite. Each image shows the same snapshot of Earth in a different wavelength. The specific wavelength bands are indicated above each image. (NASA/NOAA) This image shows the sunlit side of Earth, observed in 10 wavelengths by the EPIC instrument aboard the DSCOVR satellite. Each image shows the same snapshot of Earth in a different wavelength. The specific wavelength bands are indicated above each image. (NASA/NOAA)

This image shows the sunlit side of Earth, observed in 10 wavelengths by the EPIC instrument aboard the DSCOVR satellite. Each image shows the same snapshot of Earth in a different wavelength. The specific wavelength bands are indicated above each image. (NASA/NOAA)

This image shows the sunlit side of Earth, observed in 10 wavelengths by the EPIC instrument aboard the DSCOVR satellite. Each image shows the same snapshot of Earth in a different wavelength. The specific wavelength bands are indicated above each image. (NASA/NOAA)

This image shows the sunlit side of Earth, observed in 10 wavelengths by the EPIC instrument aboard the DSCOVR satellite. Each image shows the same snapshot of Earth in a different wavelength. The specific wavelength bands are indicated above each image. (NASA/NOAA)

This artist’s illustration shows an enhanced-color image of Earth from NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) instrument (top). EPIC observes the planet in 10 wavelength bands, shown here as 10 representational-color images (middle).  (NASA/NOAA/JPL-Caltech)
This image, taken by NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft from beyond the orbit of Neptune, shows planet Earth as seen from about 3.7 billion miles (5.9 billion km) away. Earth appears as a very small point of light in the right half of the image, indicated by an arrow. Dubbed the “Pale Blue Dot,” the image illustrates just how small an Earth-sized planet appears from far away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)