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Thursday, August 11, 2022
Home This image, taken by NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft from beyond the orbit of Neptune, shows planet Earth as seen from about 3.7 billion miles (5.9 billion km) away. Earth appears as a very small point of light in the right half of the image, indicated by an arrow. Dubbed the “Pale Blue Dot,” the image illustrates just how small an Earth-sized planet appears from far away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech) This image, taken by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft from beyond the orbit of Neptune, shows planet Earth as seen from about 3.7 billion miles (5.9 billion km) away. Earth appears as a very small point of light in the right half of the image, indicated by an arrow. Dubbed the "Pale Blue Dot," the image illustrates just how small an Earth-sized planet appears from far away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This image, taken by NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft from beyond the orbit of Neptune, shows planet Earth as seen from about 3.7 billion miles (5.9 billion km) away. Earth appears as a very small point of light in the right half of the image, indicated by an arrow. Dubbed the “Pale Blue Dot,” the image illustrates just how small an Earth-sized planet appears from far away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This image, taken by NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft from beyond the orbit of Neptune, shows planet Earth as seen from about 3.7 billion miles (5.9 billion km) away. Earth appears as a very small point of light in the right half of the image, indicated by an arrow. Dubbed the "Pale Blue Dot," the image illustrates just how small an Earth-sized planet appears from far away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This image, taken by NASA’s Voyager 1 spacecraft from beyond the orbit of Neptune, shows planet Earth as seen from about 3.7 billion miles (5.9 billion km) away. Earth appears as a very small point of light in the right half of the image, indicated by an arrow. Dubbed the “Pale Blue Dot,” the image illustrates just how small an Earth-sized planet appears from far away. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This image shows the sunlit side of Earth, observed in 10 wavelengths by the EPIC instrument aboard the DSCOVR satellite. Each image shows the same snapshot of Earth in a different wavelength. The specific wavelength bands are indicated above each image. (NASA/NOAA)