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Wednesday, February 1, 2023
Home Engineers Marleen Sundgaard (left) and Pranay Mishra measure their test lander’s “workspace” — the terrain where scientists want to set InSight’s instruments — at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPGP) Engineers Marleen Sundgaard (left) and Pranay Mishra measure their test lander's "workspace" -- the terrain where scientists want to set InSight's instruments -- at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPGP)

Engineers Marleen Sundgaard (left) and Pranay Mishra measure their test lander’s “workspace” — the terrain where scientists want to set InSight’s instruments — at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPGP)

Engineers Marleen Sundgaard (left) and Pranay Mishra measure their test lander's "workspace" -- the terrain where scientists want to set InSight's instruments -- at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPGP)

Engineers Marleen Sundgaard (left) and Pranay Mishra measure their test lander’s “workspace” — the terrain where scientists want to set InSight’s instruments — at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPGP)

Engineers in Pasadena, California, sculpt a gravel-like material to mimic the terrain in front of NASA’s InSight lander on Mars. Recreating the exact conditions will allow them to practice setting down the lander’s instruments here on Earth before it’s done on Mars. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/IPGP)