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Thursday, August 18, 2022
Home The sound of buzzing bees can be bothersome and the same is true with robots! To verify that Astrobee’s hardware works within the International Space Station’s noise limits, Roberto Carlino, electronics and integration engineer at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley conducts acoustics testing in an anechoic chamber at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston. (NASA’s Johnson Space Center/Robert Markowitz) The sound of buzzing bees can be bothersome and the same is true with robots! To verify that Astrobee’s hardware works within the International Space Station’s noise limits, Roberto Carlino, electronics and integration engineer at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley conducts acoustics testing in an anechoic chamber at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston. (NASA’s Johnson Space Center/Robert Markowitz)

The sound of buzzing bees can be bothersome and the same is true with robots! To verify that Astrobee’s hardware works within the International Space Station’s noise limits, Roberto Carlino, electronics and integration engineer at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley conducts acoustics testing in an anechoic chamber at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston. (NASA’s Johnson Space Center/Robert Markowitz)

The sound of buzzing bees can be bothersome and the same is true with robots! To verify that Astrobee’s hardware works within the International Space Station’s noise limits, Roberto Carlino, electronics and integration engineer at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley conducts acoustics testing in an anechoic chamber at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston. (NASA’s Johnson Space Center/Robert Markowitz)

The sound of buzzing bees can be bothersome and the same is true with robots! To verify that Astrobee’s hardware works within the International Space Station’s noise limits, Roberto Carlino, electronics and integration engineer at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley conducts acoustics testing in an anechoic chamber at NASA’s Johnson Space Center, Houston. (NASA’s Johnson Space Center/Robert Markowitz)

Astrobee robots are equipped with payload bays to support the installation and testing of new hardware. Jose Cortez, aerospace engineer at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, checks the fit of a robot arm that locks into the top bay. The arm can be used to “perch” on one of many handrails in the International Space Station in order to conserve power while performing other operations, such as capturing video. (NASA’s Ames Research Center/Dominic Hart)