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Wednesday, August 10, 2022
Home NASA and its industry partners continue their steady progress toward launching the nation’s newest rocket, NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS). Engineers and technicians are integrating components with the SLS launch vehicle stage adapter, which connects the core stage of the world’s most powerful rocket with its interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) that provides the power to send Orion to the Moon. (NASA) NASA and its industry partners continue their steady progress toward launching the nation's newest rocket, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). Engineers and technicians are integrating components with the SLS launch vehicle stage adapter, which connects the core stage of the world's most powerful rocket with its interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) that provides the power to send Orion to the Moon. (NASA)

NASA and its industry partners continue their steady progress toward launching the nation’s newest rocket, NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS). Engineers and technicians are integrating components with the SLS launch vehicle stage adapter, which connects the core stage of the world’s most powerful rocket with its interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) that provides the power to send Orion to the Moon. (NASA)

NASA and its industry partners continue their steady progress toward launching the nation's newest rocket, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS). Engineers and technicians are integrating components with the SLS launch vehicle stage adapter, which connects the core stage of the world's most powerful rocket with its interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) that provides the power to send Orion to the Moon. (NASA)

NASA and its industry partners continue their steady progress toward launching the nation’s newest rocket, NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS). Engineers and technicians are integrating components with the SLS launch vehicle stage adapter, which connects the core stage of the world’s most powerful rocket with its interim cryogenic propulsion stage (ICPS) that provides the power to send Orion to the Moon. (NASA)

The largest piece of structural test hardware for America’s new deep space rocket, the Space Launch System, was loaded into Test Stand 4693 at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama Jan. 14, 2019. The liquid hydrogen tank is part of the rocket’s core stage that is more than 200 feet tall with a diameter of 27.6 feet, and stores cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the vehicle’s RS-25 engines. (NASA/Tyler Martin)