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Saturday, May 28, 2022
Home This image from the Suomi NPP satellite shows the smoke all the way to south of western Australia (data from Jan.13, 2020). After the black line, the data is from Jan. 12, 2020. The circled area is from Jan. 12 and shows the smoke from western Australia. he aerosol index signal in central Australia (at the left of the image) is not from smoke but from an intense dust storm. (NASA/Colin Seftor) This image from the Suomi NPP satellite shows the smoke all the way to south of western Australia (data from Jan.13, 2020). After the black line, the data is from Jan. 12, 2020. The circled area is from Jan. 12 and shows the smoke from western Australia. he aerosol index signal in central Australia (at the left of the image) is not from smoke but from an intense dust storm. (NASA/Colin Seftor)

This image from the Suomi NPP satellite shows the smoke all the way to south of western Australia (data from Jan.13, 2020). After the black line, the data is from Jan. 12, 2020. The circled area is from Jan. 12 and shows the smoke from western Australia. he aerosol index signal in central Australia (at the left of the image) is not from smoke but from an intense dust storm. (NASA/Colin Seftor)

This image from the Suomi NPP satellite shows the smoke all the way to south of western Australia (data from Jan.13, 2020). After the black line, the data is from Jan. 12, 2020. The circled area is from Jan. 12 and shows the smoke from western Australia. he aerosol index signal in central Australia (at the left of the image) is not from smoke but from an intense dust storm. (NASA/Colin Seftor)

This image from the Suomi NPP satellite shows the smoke all the way to south of western Australia (data from Jan.13, 2020). After the black line, the data is from Jan. 12, 2020. The circled area is from Jan. 12 and shows the smoke from western Australia. he aerosol index signal in central Australia (at the left of the image) is not from smoke but from an intense dust storm. (NASA/Colin Seftor)

This image of the UV aerosol index from the Suomi NPP satellite OMPS Nadir Mapper instrument showing a “close-up” from Jan. 13, 2020 (specifically orbit 42546). The image reveals that the smoke has now made its all the way back to eastern Australia (black circle). The red circle shows “newly formed” (or current) smoke that has just been emitted from the fires. The green circle shows the dust from an intense dust storm. (NASA/Colin Seftor)
This image was taken on Jan. 13, 2020 by NOAA/NASA’s Suomi NPP satellite. The image shows the fires in eastern Australia and using the VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) several reflective bands have been introduced into the image to highlight areas that have been burned as well as smoke and clouds coming off the fire affected areas. Burned areas or fire-affected areas are characterized by deposits of charcoal and ash, removal of vegetation and/or the alteration of vegetation structure. Areas unaffected by fire will appear bright green. Clouds comprised of small water droplets scatter light equally in both the visible and will appear white. These clouds are usually lower to the ground and warmer. High and cold clouds are comprised of ice crystals and will appear turquoise. On the left edge of the image, Kangaroo Island can be seen. (NASA’s Worldview)