62.1 F
Clarksville
Tuesday, May 24, 2022
Home This annotated image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Tarantula Nebula in infrared light. The supernova 1987A and the starburst region R136 are noted. The magenta-colored regions are primarily interstellar dust that is similar in composition to ash from coal or wood fires on Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech) This annotated image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Tarantula Nebula in infrared light. The supernova 1987A and the starburst region R136 are noted. The magenta-colored regions are primarily interstellar dust that is similar in composition to ash from coal or wood fires on Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This annotated image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Tarantula Nebula in infrared light. The supernova 1987A and the starburst region R136 are noted. The magenta-colored regions are primarily interstellar dust that is similar in composition to ash from coal or wood fires on Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This annotated image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Tarantula Nebula in infrared light. The supernova 1987A and the starburst region R136 are noted. The magenta-colored regions are primarily interstellar dust that is similar in composition to ash from coal or wood fires on Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This annotated image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Tarantula Nebula in infrared light. The supernova 1987A and the starburst region R136 are noted. The magenta-colored regions are primarily interstellar dust that is similar in composition to ash from coal or wood fires on Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows the Tarantula Nebula in two wavelengths of infrared light. The red regions indicate the presence of particularly hot gas, while the blue regions are interstellar dust that is similar in composition to ash from coal or wood-burning fires on Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)