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HomeNewsBlanchfield Army Community Hospital celebrates the Army Noncommissioned Officer Corps

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital celebrates the Army Noncommissioned Officer Corps

Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH)Fort Campbell, KY – On January 24th, 2020, Blanchfield Army Community Hospital (BACH) recognized the history and significance of the Army’s Noncommissioned Officer Corps during a combined Sergeant Audie Murphy Club and NCO Induction Ceremony on Fort Campbell.

Four senior NCOs were inducted into the SAMC and 18 sergeants were welcomed into the NCO Corps by the hospital’s top NCO, Command Sgt. Maj. Daniel Santiago.

During a combined Sergeant Audie Murphy Club and NCO Induction Ceremony, January 24 on Fort Campbell, Kentucky, BACH Command Sgt. Major Daniel Santiago formally welcomes 18 new sergeants to the NCO Corps and charges them to mentor, guide, coach and direct those Soldiers under them. (US Army photo by David Gillespie)
During a combined Sergeant Audie Murphy Club and NCO Induction Ceremony, January 24 on Fort Campbell, Kentucky, BACH Command Sgt. Major Daniel Santiago formally welcomes 18 new sergeants to the NCO Corps and charges them to mentor, guide, coach and direct those Soldiers under them. (US Army photo by David Gillespie)

“We decided to combine these two important events because each represents a significant milestone in an NCO’s career. It’s always valuable to pause, reflect and rededicate ourselves to the roles and responsibilities we swear to uphold as NCOs in the U.S. Army. Together we reflected on the purpose and responsibilities of the NCO Corps, from corporal all the way to Sergeant Major of the Army, and what we owe our Soldiers,” said Santiago.

“Combining the SAMC induction was a perfect opportunity to bring our corps together and for our new sergeants to see what right looks like as they continue to develop as leaders. Our team worked hard to make this event special and I am very proud of their efforts,” Santiago stated.

An NCO Induction Ceremony is a time-honored Army custom marking the transition of an individual Soldier to a leader in the NCO Corps.

BACH Sgt. DeMarcus Heath prepares to step through the arch of the Noncommissioned Officer, formally joining the ranks of the Army's NCO Corps, during an NCO Induction ceremony on Fort Campbell, Kentucky, January 24. BACH held a combined Sergeant Audie Murphy Club and NCO Induction Ceremony celebrate the history and significance of the corps, known as the back bone of the Army, and to formally welcome its newest sergeants. (US Army photo by David Gillespie)
BACH Sgt. DeMarcus Heath prepares to step through the arch of the Noncommissioned Officer, formally joining the ranks of the Army’s NCO Corps, during an NCO Induction ceremony on Fort Campbell, Kentucky, January 24. BACH held a combined Sergeant Audie Murphy Club and NCO Induction Ceremony celebrate the history and significance of the corps, known as the back bone of the Army, and to formally welcome its newest sergeants. (US Army photo by David Gillespie)

It’s a formal recognition for new corporals and sergeants, marking their increased responsibility for training and leading junior enlisted Soldiers for a ready Force.

The Sergeant Audie Murphy Club recognizes NCOs who significantly contribute to the development of a professional NCO Corps and a combat ready Army. Awardees exemplify leadership, characterized by personal concern for the needs, training, development and welfare of Soldiers as well as concern for the families of Soldiers and their community. Members are selected based on demonstrated leadership, professionalism and must pass a rigorous local and regional selection board.

One of the Soldiers inducted into the SAMC during the ceremony said she was very moved by the combined ceremony.

“It touches my heart to see the traditions and the heritage of the Army put on so well and in such a special ceremony for these NCOs, who are now in the NCO Corps,” said SAMC inductee, Sgt. 1st Class Moriah Mattingly, the hospital’s Plans, Training Mobilization and Security NCO in Charge.

“[These sergeants] kind of flip that switch – now, they’re an NCO. They’re no longer a specialist and this ceremony kind of turns that over for them. I remember that from when I went through my NCO induction ceremony, as well. It becomes real,” Mattingly stated.

BACH Command Sgt. Major Daniel Santiago places a Sergeant Audie Murphy Club medallion on SAMC inductee Sgt. 1st Class Moriah Mattingly, the hospital's operations NCOIC. Mattingly and three other Soldiers were inducted into the SAMC during a combined SAMC and NCO Induction Ceremony, January 24 on Fort Campbell, Kentucky. (US Army photo by David Gillespie)
BACH Command Sgt. Major Daniel Santiago places a Sergeant Audie Murphy Club medallion on SAMC inductee Sgt. 1st Class Moriah Mattingly, the hospital’s operations NCOIC. Mattingly and three other Soldiers were inducted into the SAMC during a combined SAMC and NCO Induction Ceremony, January 24 on Fort Campbell, Kentucky. (US Army photo by David Gillespie)

Santiago said a formal induction also helps to build camaraderie and instill pride in his NCOs.

“I wanted to do a ceremony that makes getting promoted to sergeant a big deal for them, so they know now that they are part of the NCO Corps. We want them to know that becoming a noncommissioned officer is more than just going to a promotion board, more than taking some college classes or online courses. It’s a change of mindset. It’s about understanding that they’re going to have Soldiers under them, looking for guidance, for mentorship, for direction, and these sergeants have to be able to provide that,” said Santiago.

For experienced NCOs, the induction was an opportunity to reconnect with their fellow NCOs and the roots of the NCO Corps. For newer Soldiers and others who had never participated in an NCO induction ceremony, it was a powerful display of Army NCOs through time.

The ceremony featured Soldiers in period uniforms dating back to the Revolutionary War demonstrating the contributions of NCOs throughout the Army’s history. A narrator shared how each NCO from the past trained and led their Soldiers, the challenges they faced at the time and the adversity they had to overcome.

Later, a model was assembled during the ceremony representing a Soldier for each NCO rank in the Army, from corporal to the Sergeant Major of the Army. One by one, as they added each segment to the model, they shared the duties and responsibilities each rank served in the NCO Corps, giving it shape.

With the final segment added, it revealed a back bone representing the role NCOs serve as the backbone of the Army.

BACH Soldier of the Year Pfc. Austin Clayton, places the final piece atop a model that demonstrates how Army NCOs from corporal to the Sergeant Major of the Army make the backbone of the Army. (US Army photo by David Gillespie)
BACH Soldier of the Year Pfc. Austin Clayton, places the final piece atop a model that demonstrates how Army NCOs from corporal to the Sergeant Major of the Army make the backbone of the Army. (US Army photo by David Gillespie)

“It was great. It was a great experience to get recognized for being an NCO and reinforcing all our standards and traditions, and making sure we can uphold those standards,” said NCO inductee, Sgt. DeMarcus Heath, assigned to the hospital’s Town Center Pharmacy. “I’ve had a lot of NCOs. They led the way, led by example and taught me a lot of things about myself, about life in general, as well as helped me with my professional goals.”

The ceremony concluded with a reciting of the NCO Creed and a charge from Santiago to all his NCOs.

“I’m very proud of these NCOs who were inducted today. Now it is up to them to mentor, guide, coach and direct those Soldiers under them, and those NCOs under them, so they may also reach these achievements,” said Santiago.

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