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Home Thick white clouds are present in this JunoCam image of Jupiter’s equatorial zone. At microwave frequencies, these clouds are transparent, allowing Juno’s Microwave Radiometer to measure water deep into Jupiter’s atmosphere. The image was acquired during Juno’s flyby on Dec. 16, 2017. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill) Thick white clouds are present in this JunoCam image of Jupiter's equatorial zone. At microwave frequencies, these clouds are transparent, allowing Juno's Microwave Radiometer to measure water deep into Jupiter's atmosphere. The image was acquired during Juno's flyby on Dec. 16, 2017. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill)

Thick white clouds are present in this JunoCam image of Jupiter’s equatorial zone. At microwave frequencies, these clouds are transparent, allowing Juno’s Microwave Radiometer to measure water deep into Jupiter’s atmosphere. The image was acquired during Juno’s flyby on Dec. 16, 2017. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill)

Thick white clouds are present in this JunoCam image of Jupiter's equatorial zone. At microwave frequencies, these clouds are transparent, allowing Juno's Microwave Radiometer to measure water deep into Jupiter's atmosphere. The image was acquired during Juno's flyby on Dec. 16, 2017. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill)

Thick white clouds are present in this JunoCam image of Jupiter’s equatorial zone. At microwave frequencies, these clouds are transparent, allowing Juno’s Microwave Radiometer to measure water deep into Jupiter’s atmosphere. The image was acquired during Juno’s flyby on Dec. 16, 2017. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill)

The JunoCam imager aboard NASA’s Juno spacecraft captured this image of Jupiter’s southern equatorial region on Sept. 1, 2017. The image is oriented so Jupiter’s poles (not visible) run left-to-right of frame. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SwRI/MSSS/Kevin M. Gill)