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Tuesday, May 24, 2022
Home This image of the nameplate secured to the arm of NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover was taken at a payload servicing facility at Kennedy Space Center soon after being attached on March 4, 2020. The laser-etched plate serves as a rock and debris shield that will protect a flexible electrical cable. (NASA/JPL-Caltech) This image of the nameplate secured to the arm of NASA's Mars Perseverance rover was taken at a payload servicing facility at Kennedy Space Center soon after being attached on March 4, 2020. The laser-etched plate serves as a rock and debris shield that will protect a flexible electrical cable. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This image of the nameplate secured to the arm of NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover was taken at a payload servicing facility at Kennedy Space Center soon after being attached on March 4, 2020. The laser-etched plate serves as a rock and debris shield that will protect a flexible electrical cable. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This image of the nameplate secured to the arm of NASA's Mars Perseverance rover was taken at a payload servicing facility at Kennedy Space Center soon after being attached on March 4, 2020. The laser-etched plate serves as a rock and debris shield that will protect a flexible electrical cable. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This image of the nameplate secured to the arm of NASA’s Mars Perseverance rover was taken at a payload servicing facility at Kennedy Space Center soon after being attached on March 4, 2020. The laser-etched plate serves as a rock and debris shield that will protect a flexible electrical cable. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Members of JPL’s assembly, test and launch operations team for NASA’s Perseverance mission show appreciation for their newly named rover. The image was taken on March 4, 2020, at a payload processing facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)
Lori Glaze, director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division, looks on as Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, congratulates Alexander Mather on March 5, 2020, during a celebration at Lake Braddock Secondary School in Burke, Virginia. The seventh grader had the honor of naming the agency’s next Mars rover after submitting the winning entry to the agency’s “Name the Rover” essay contest, which received 28,000 entrants from K-12 students from every U.S. state and territory. (NASA)