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Friday, May 20, 2022
Home Composite image of the Cigar Galaxy, a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The magnetic field detected by SOFIA, shown as streamlines, appears to follow the bipolar outflows (red) generated by the intense nuclear starburst. (NASA/SOFIA/Enrique Lopez-Rodriguez; NASA/JPL-Caltech) Composite image of the Cigar Galaxy, a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The magnetic field detected by SOFIA, shown as streamlines, appears to follow the bipolar outflows (red) generated by the intense nuclear starburst. (NASA/SOFIA/Enrique Lopez-Rodriguez; NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Composite image of the Cigar Galaxy, a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The magnetic field detected by SOFIA, shown as streamlines, appears to follow the bipolar outflows (red) generated by the intense nuclear starburst. (NASA/SOFIA/Enrique Lopez-Rodriguez; NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Composite image of the Cigar Galaxy, a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The magnetic field detected by SOFIA, shown as streamlines, appears to follow the bipolar outflows (red) generated by the intense nuclear starburst. (NASA/SOFIA/Enrique Lopez-Rodriguez; NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Composite image of the Cigar Galaxy, a starburst galaxy about 12 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. The magnetic field detected by SOFIA, shown as streamlines, appears to follow the bipolar outflows (red) generated by the intense nuclear starburst. (NASA/SOFIA/Enrique Lopez-Rodriguez; NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Composite image of W51A, the largest star-forming region in our galaxy. Dozens of massive stars that are more than eight times the size of our Sun are forming there. (NASA/SOFIA/Wanggi Lim, James De Buizer; NASA/JPL-Caltech)
This infrared image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope shows Messier 82, or the “Cigar galaxy,” smothered in smoky dust particles (red) blown out into space by the galaxy’s hot stars (blue). (NASA/JPL-Caltech)