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Sunday, May 22, 2022
Home This image of an area called Crisscrossing Bands shows ridges, which may form when a crack in the surface opens and closes repeatedly. In contrast, the smooth bands shown here form where a crack continues pulling apart horizontally, producing large, wide, relatively flat features. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute) This image of an area called Crisscrossing Bands shows ridges, which may form when a crack in the surface opens and closes repeatedly. In contrast, the smooth bands shown here form where a crack continues pulling apart horizontally, producing large, wide, relatively flat features. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute)

This image of an area called Crisscrossing Bands shows ridges, which may form when a crack in the surface opens and closes repeatedly. In contrast, the smooth bands shown here form where a crack continues pulling apart horizontally, producing large, wide, relatively flat features. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute)

This image of an area called Crisscrossing Bands shows ridges, which may form when a crack in the surface opens and closes repeatedly. In contrast, the smooth bands shown here form where a crack continues pulling apart horizontally, producing large, wide, relatively flat features. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute)

This image of an area called Crisscrossing Bands shows ridges, which may form when a crack in the surface opens and closes repeatedly. In contrast, the smooth bands shown here form where a crack continues pulling apart horizontally, producing large, wide, relatively flat features. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute)

In this gallery of three newly reprocessed Europa images, details are visible in the variety of features on the moon’s icy surface. This image of an area called Chaos Transition shows blocks that have moved and ridges possibly related to how the crust fractures from the force of Jupiter’s gravity. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute)
This image shows chaos terrain where blocks of material have shifted, rotated, tilted and refrozen. Scientists use this as a puzzle for clues about how the surface has changed. The area is called Chaos Near Agenor Linea for its proximity to the wide band of that name at the bottom of the image. (NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute)