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Topic: Blue Jeans

Hats off to the Ladies

 

hatsClarksville, TN – It is no longer acceptable since Women’s Liberation to be called a lady. The term took on unacceptable connotations because it was viewed as a way that men kept women “in their places.” To be a lady meant you were theoretically put on a pedestal but were subliminally considered not quite up to par with a man.

Ladies were the people for whom men opened doors, who wore hats and gloves, who did not enter the workplace and expect equal pay for equal work, who never swore in public or elsewhere, who spent most of their time making themselves attractive for their husbands’ pleasure, who loved spending their lives cleaning and cooking and being the June Cleaver from “Leave It to Beaver” or the mother on “Father Knows Best.” «Read the rest of this article»

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Clarksville Police asking for public’s help in locating missing man with Alzheimer’s

 

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UPDATE: 11:43am Mr. Grizzard has been located.  The search has been called off.

Clarksville, TN – The Clarksville Police Department is asking for the public’s help in locating a missing elderly man with Alzheimer’s. Maxie Dean Grizzard, 77 (DOB- 6/22/36), was last seen on today’s date, November 21st, 2013, at approximately 12am, at his residence, located at the 200 block of Turnberry Circle, near Old Sango Rd. by Madison St.

He is described as a white male, 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighing 165 pounds. He has brown eyes and gray hair. He was last seen wearing baggy blue jeans, a green and beige plaid jacket, a blue shirt, and a Tennessee cap, which is beige with an orange “T” on the front. Also, he wears prescription glasses. «Read the rest of this article»

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Hats off to the Ladies!

 

hatsIt is no longer acceptable since Women’s Liberation to be called a lady. The term took on unacceptable connotations because it was viewed as a way that men kept women “in their places.” To be a lady meant you were theoretically put on a pedestal but were subliminally considered not quite up to par with a man.

Ladies were the people for whom men opened doors, who wore hats and gloves, who did not enter the workplace and expect equal pay for equal work, who never swore in public or elsewhere, who spent most of their time making themselves attractive for their husbands’ pleasure, who loved spending their lives cleaning and cooking and being the June Cleaver from “Leave It to Beaver” or the mother on “Father Knows Best.”

Granted, some of these thought patterns were totally archaic. When World War II took over our country, “manning” the factories became women’s work. When the war was over, many women were no longer contented to return to scrubbing the kitchen and baking homemade bread instead of earning money of their own and having a career. When the bra-burning era erupted in the Sixties, women became outspoken in their contempt for many of their former roles and the expectations that society demanded of them.

Women still earn about 20 per cent less than men for similar work. To put this in perspective, think of a man who earns $40,000 a year; a woman would earn $32,000 a year, a considerable difference. «Read the rest of this article»

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