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World War II Veteran Honored in Ceremony

 

George Kazuo NishimuraClarksville,TN – Friends and family gathered on Friday to honor George Kazuo Nishimura, who was a member of the famed 442nd Regimental Combat Team, Military Intelligence Service.

Sponsored in part by F&M Bank and Clarksville Online, the ceremony was to present Nishimura with a bronze replica of the Congressional Gold Medal that had been awarded to his unit in 2010, in a unanimous vote of Congress, and approved by President Barack Obama.

Nishimura was left off of the list of veterans to receive their recognition due to a field promotion he received while serving his country, and a change in his serial number.  Through the efforts of friends and family, Nishimura received his award and was given his place in history on Friday.

George Kazuo Nishimura and his family.

George Kazuo Nishimura and his family.

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One Man’s Medal: The Story of George Nishimura-Part 4

 
George Nishimura

George Nishimura

Clarksville, TN – In researching this story, and getting to know the life of George Nishimura, I’ve learned so much about World War II that I have never known before.  His personal handwritten account of his life is an amazing recollection of what it was like growing up in a country that came under attack from the Japanese, and how he wanted to “do something” to help the Americans fight back.

George Nishimura served his country in the best way he knew how.  He followed orders and did what he was told.  The Japanese-American soldiers who volunteered to serve, were treated differently.  There was a feeling of apprehension by most Americans, who wondered how can the “Japs” be the good guy and bad? «Read the rest of this article»

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One Man’s Medal: The Story of George Nishimura – Part 3

 
George Nishimura

George Nishimura

Clarksville, TN – George Nishimura was now half a world away from home, his family, and all that he had known, as a member of the United States Army, at Camp Shelby Mississippi. The trip had been long and hard, but they were ready to begin their training.

Thousands of Japanese-American men had joined the Army, and were ready to serve.

George and his fellow soldiers were joined at Camp Shelby by 1200 mainland volunteers from the relocation camps. They were called “Katonks” because of the sound their head made when hit, like the sound of a hollow coconut. «Read the rest of this article»

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