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American Heart Association reports Rejected, Unfilled Prescriptions for new, more expensive Cholesterol Drugs tied to higher Heart, Stroke Risk

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Patients appear to be at higher risk of heart problems or stroke when prescriptions for the newest cholesterol-lowering drugs are rejected by insurance companies or unfilled by patients, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

The drugs, PCSK9 inhibitors (PCSK9i), can substantially lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL, the “bad” cholesterol) in the blood.

Prescriptions for the newest – but more expensive - cholesterol-lowering drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors that are not covered by insurance companies or unfilled by patients are related to higher risk of cardiovascular problems for high risk patients. (American Heart Association)

Prescriptions for the newest – but more expensive – cholesterol-lowering drugs called PCSK9 inhibitors that are not covered by insurance companies or unfilled by patients are related to higher risk of cardiovascular problems for high risk patients. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says NASA Astronauts less likely to faint on Earth if they Exercise in Space

 

Findings May Help Others with Fainting Issues

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Nearly 50 years after man’s first steps on the moon, researchers have discovered a way that may help NASA astronauts spending prolonged time in space come back to Earth on more stable footing, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

“One of the biggest problems since the inception of the manned space program has been that astronauts have fainted when they came down to Earth ,” said Benjamin Levine, M.D., the study’s senior author who is professor of Exercise Sciences at UT Southwestern Medical Center and director of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas.

Former Canadian Astronaut Robert “Bob” Thirsk wearing device which continuously measures blood pressure. (NASA)

Former Canadian Astronaut Robert “Bob” Thirsk wearing device which continuously measures blood pressure. (NASA)

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American Heart Association says Protect your Heart in the Heat

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The American Heart Association, the world’s leading nonprofit organization focused on heart and brain health for all, is urging people to take precautions to protect their hearts in hot weather.
 
Hot temperatures and high humidity can cause a dangerous heat index that can be hard on the heart. Dehydration causes the heart to work harder, putting it at risk.

Stay Hydrated in the the heart. (American Heart Association)

Stay Hydrated in the the heart. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Cardiac arrest among hospitalized patients may be underestimated

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Significantly more patients suffer cardiac arrests in U.S. hospitals each year than previously estimated, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

Cardiac arrest, which occurs when the heart malfunctions and stops beating, is not the same as a heart attack, which occurs when blood flow to the heart is blocked.

The health burden of in-hospital adult cardiac arrest is about 38% greater than earlier reports and 18% greater for children, according to one study. (American Heart Association)

The health burden of in-hospital adult cardiac arrest is about 38% greater than earlier reports and 18% greater for children, according to one study. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Low Vitamin D at Birth raises risk of Higher Blood Pressure in Kids

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension, vitamin D deficiency from birth to early childhood was associated with an increased risk of elevated blood pressure in later childhood and adolescence.

Researchers followed 775 children from birth to age 18 at the Boston Medical Center. Most lived in a low-income, urban area and 68% of the children were African American. Low vitamin D levels were defined as less than 11 ng/ml (nanograms per millimeter) in cord blood at birth and less than 25 ng/ml in a child’s blood during early childhood.

The study findings suggest that vitamin D screening and supplementation in pregnancy and early childhood could prevent or reduce the risk of elevated blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

The study findings suggest that vitamin D screening and supplementation in pregnancy and early childhood could prevent or reduce the risk of elevated blood pressure later in life. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Long Work Hours associated with increased risk of Stroke

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke, people who worked long hours had a higher risk of stroke, especially if they worked those hours for 10 years or more.

Researchers reviewed data from CONSTANCES, a French population-based study group started in 2012, for information on age (18-69), sex, smoking and work hours derived from questionnaires from 143,592 participants. Cardiovascular risk factors and previous stroke occurrences were noted from separate medical interviews.

People under age 50 had a higher risk of stroke when working long hours for a decade or more. (American Heart Association)

People under age 50 had a higher risk of stroke when working long hours for a decade or more. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Hypertension Drug may hold promise for Alzheimer’s Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Hypertension, while seeking new treatments to slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease, researchers found the blood pressure drug nilvadipine increased blood flow to the brain’s memory and learning center among people with Alzheimer’s disease without affecting other parts of the brain.

These findings indicate that the known decrease in cerebral blood flow in patients with Alzheimer’s can be reversed in some regions. However, it is unclear if this translates to clinical benefits. (American Heart Association)

These findings indicate that the known decrease in cerebral blood flow in patients with Alzheimer’s can be reversed in some regions. However, it is unclear if this translates to clinical benefits. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports U.S. Soldiers have worse Heart Health than Civilians

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to new research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, active duty Army personnel have worse cardiovascular health compared to people of similar ages in the civilian population.

Researchers compared a group of more than 263,000 active duty Army soldiers, age 17-64, who had a health examination in 2012 with a similar group of U.S. civilians participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) in 2011-2012.

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

Less than one-third of soldiers studied had ideal blood pressure compared to about half the civilian population. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association reports Energy Drinks may increase risk of Heart Function Abnormalities, Blood Pressure Changes

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – According to a small study published in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association, drinking 32 ounces of an energy drink in a short time span may increase blood pressure and the risk of electrical disturbances in the heart. This can affect heart rhythm.

Three to four hours after drinking 32 ounces of energy drinks, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a placebo drink. (American Heart Association)

Three to four hours after drinking 32 ounces of energy drinks, the heart’s electrical activity was abnormal compared to drinking a placebo drink. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association releases information about Children’s Heart Muscle Diseases

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – A new scientific statement from the American Heart Association focuses on Cardiomyopathies (heart muscle diseases) in children  and provides insight into the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases as well as identifying future research priorities. It will be published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

Cardiomyopathies (heart muscle diseases) in children are the focus of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association that provides insight into the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases as well as identifying future research priorities. (American Heart Association)

Cardiomyopathies (heart muscle diseases) in children are the focus of a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association that provides insight into the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases as well as identifying future research priorities. (American Heart Association)

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