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Topic: Folklore

There is some Interesting Information in the Wacky World of Wildflowers

 

Clarksville Book ReviewClarksville, TN – Wildflower Folklore by Laura C. Martin is a book I recently found at a library book sale. It has extensive information about many plants that Southerners have been familiar with for generations.

For instance, kudzu was first introduced to the United States through the Japanese Pavilion during the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876. The Japanese used kudzu for food, medicine, and as a forage plant. Their intensive land-use practices kept it under control in their country, but we Southerners let it get out of control.

Kudzu was first thought to be a wonder cure for eroded areas here in the South because it would grow quickly even in our red clay. At first, it was grown commercially as a forage plant and was hailed as “King Kudzu.”

Kudzu, the plant that ate the south.

Kudzu, the plant that ate the south.

«Read the rest of this article»

 

NASA says the Harvest Moon will be in the night sky September 19th

 

Written by Dr. Tony Phillips
Science at NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – According to folklore, every full Moon has a special name. There’s the Wolf Moon, the Snow Moon, the Worm Moon, the Sprouting Grass Moon, the Flower Moon, the Strawberry Moon, the Thunder Moon, the Sturgeon Moon, the Harvest Moon, the Hunter’s Moon, the Beaver Moon, and the Long Night’s Moon.

Each name tells us something about the season or month in which the full Moon appears.

This month’s full Moon is the Harvest Moon.

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Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

Noted East Tennessee Novelist Greene to Give July 13th Reading at APSU

 

Clarksville, TN – Up in the foothills of East Tennessee’s Smoky Mountains, a few old timers still tell folk stories of spirits and curses. The fog that hangs low over their porches and sloping front yards lends a mystical quality to their words. It’s as if these men and women live in the secluded last bastion of a magical world, untouched by the modern influence of science. «Read the rest of this article»

 


The Wacky World of Wildflowers Holds Some Interesting Information

 

Wildflower Folklore by Laura C. Martin is a book I recently found at a library book sale. It has extensive information about many plants that Southerners have been familiar with for generations.

For instance, kudzu was first introduced to the United States through the Japanese Pavilion during the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition in 1876. The Japanese used kudzu for food, medicine, and as a forage plant. Their intensive land-use practices kept it under control in their country, but we Southerners let it get out of control.

Kudzu was first thought to be a wonder cure for eroded areas here in the South because it would grow quickly even in our red clay. At first, it was grown commercially as a forage plant and was hailed as “King Kudzu.” When it began to “eat” telephone poles and trees, people became more than disenchanted with it and began calling it the “plant that ate the South.” Since it can grow 80 to 100 feet during one growing season, kudzu can be controlled by grazing goats but the highway department has yet to discover this fact.

Kudzu, the plant that ate the south.

Kudzu, the plant that ate the south.

«Read the rest of this article»

 



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