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Topic: NASA’s Aqua Satellite

NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder instrument observes California Wildfires’ Carbon Monoxide output

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard the Aqua satellite, captured carbon monoxide plumes coming from California wildfires last week. There were 28 major wildfires burning across the state as of September 14th, 2020. This includes the August Complex Fire, which started on August 17th and has since burned over 471,000 acres, making it the largest fire on record in California.

The animation shows three-day averages of carbon monoxide concentrations around 3 miles (5 kilometers) up in the atmosphere between September 6th and September 14th.

This visualization shows a three-day average of carbon monoxide concentrations from Sept. 6 to 14

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NASA observes California’s Wildfires from Space, Air

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – As California experiences one of the worst wildfire seasons on record, NASA is leveraging its resources to help. Scientists supporting the agency’s Applied Sciences Disaster Program in the Earth Sciences Division are generating maps and other data products that track active fires and their smoke plumes while also identifying areas that may be susceptible to future risks.

“When disasters like this occur, we are able to swiftly respond to requests from our partners who need images and mapping data,” said David Green, manager of the Disasters Program at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

Captured by the ASTER instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite, this false-color map shows the burn area of the River and Carmel fires in Monterey County, California. Vegetation (including crops) is shown in red; the burn area (dark blue/gray) is in the center of the image. (NASA/METI/AIST/Japan Space Systems)

Captured by the ASTER instrument aboard NASA’s Terra satellite, this false-color map shows the burn area of the River and Carmel fires in Monterey County, California. Vegetation (including crops) is shown in red; the burn area (dark blue/gray) is in the center of the image. (NASA/METI/AIST/Japan Space Systems)

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NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument observes Hurricane Douglas, Tropical Storm Hanna

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) was monitoring two storm systems as they took aim at portions of Hawaii and Texas on July 26th. Perched on NASA’s Aqua satellite, AIRS is an instrument that studies Earth’s weather and climate.

As of 11:00am local time, Hurricane Douglas was sweeping toward Hawaii with the potential to directly hit portions of the islands, from Maui to Kauai, in the late afternoon or evening.

NASA's AIRS instrument captured this image of Hurricane Douglas at 1:53am local time on July 26th, 2020, as the storm swept towards the Hawaiian Islands. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

NASA’s AIRS instrument captured this image of Hurricane Douglas at 1:53am local time on July 26th, 2020, as the storm swept towards the Hawaiian Islands. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s Aqua Satellite watches Hurricane Douglas as it heads toward Hawaii

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA’s Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Hurricane Douglas is it continued on its track toward Hawaii. The storm is now a Category 2 hurricane and warnings were posted on July 25th, 2020 as the storm approaches.

The Central Pacific Hurricane Center has posted warnings for Douglas.

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for Hawaii County, Maui County, including the islands of Maui, Lanai, Molokai and Kahoolawe.

On July 24 at 12:30pm CT, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Hurricane Douglas as it continued on a track toward the Hawaiian Islands. The image showed a clear eye with a circular structure. (NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS))

On July 24 at 12:30pm CT, the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite provided a visible image of Hurricane Douglas as it continued on a track toward the Hawaiian Islands. The image showed a clear eye with a circular structure. (NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS))

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NASA’s AIRS instrument observes Tropical Storm Fay as it hits East Coast

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Tropical Storm Fay is sweeping across New England, with the center of the storm making landfall about 10 miles (15 kilometers) north-northeast of Atlantic City, New Jersey, at around 5:00pm local time.

At that time, Fay had maximum sustained winds of around 50 mph (85 kph). Forecasters predicted the storm will dump up to 7 inches (18 centimeters) of rain along its path from Delaware into New Jersey.

NASA's AIRS instrument captured this image of Tropical Storm Fay around 2 p.m. local time on July 10, 2020, as the storm swept through New England. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

NASA’s AIRS instrument captured this image of Tropical Storm Fay around 2 p.m. local time on July 10, 2020, as the storm swept through New England. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA Analyzes Cristobal, the Big Rainmaker

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA’s Aqua satellite gathered infrared imagery and cloud top temperature data on Tropical Depression Cristobal, and it revealed the heavy rainmaking capability of the storm.

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) forecasts Cristobal to track northward through the Gulf of Mexico and toward Louisiana’s coast. Watches and warnings have gone into effect.

On June 5th, the NHC issued a Storm Surge Watch for the northern Gulf of Mexico coast from Indian Pass to Arepika, Florida, and from Grand Isle, Louisiana, to Ocean Springs, Mississippi, including Lake Borgne. In addition, a Tropical Storm Watch has been issued for the northern Gulf of Mexico coast from Intracoastal City Louisiana to the Alabama/Florida border, including Lake Pontchartrain and Lake Maurepas.

On June 5th at 3:05am CDT (0805 UTC), the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite gathered temperature information about Tropical Depression Cristobal’s cloud tops. MODIS found several areas of powerful thunderstorms (yellow and red) where temperatures were as cold as or colder than minus 70 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 56.6 Celsius). (NASA/NRL)

On June 5th at 3:05am CDT (0805 UTC), the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite gathered temperature information about Tropical Depression Cristobal’s cloud tops. MODIS found several areas of powerful thunderstorms (yellow and red) where temperatures were as cold as or colder than minus 70 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 56.6 Celsius). (NASA/NRL)

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NASA uses Satellites to Help Forecast Wildlife Migration in Yellowstone National Park

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationMountain View, CA – The research project looked specifically at how long the growing season lasts in Yellowstone  National Park, from snowmelt in spring to first snowfall in autumn, and the vegetation that covers the land in between.

The satellite data revealed that the season for vegetation growth has been getting longer, likely a result of climate change decreasing the severity of winters and warming average temperatures overall.

Studying national parks is helpful for this type of climate research, because human land use is restricted in these spaces.

A study using data from two NASA Earth science satellites reveals that the season for vegetation growth has been getting longer in Yellowstone National Park. Likely a result of climate change decreasing the severity of winters and warming average temperatures overall, this effect on the productivity of grasslands has contributed to the growing number of bison in the park. (Joshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory)

A study using data from two NASA Earth science satellites reveals that the season for vegetation growth has been getting longer in Yellowstone National Park. Likely a result of climate change decreasing the severity of winters and warming average temperatures overall, this effect on the productivity of grasslands has contributed to the growing number of bison in the park. (Joshua Stevens/NASA Earth Observatory)

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NASA Examines Hurricane Dorian’s Rainfall, Temperatures Along Carolina Coast

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – As Hurricane Dorian continued to lash the coast of the Carolinas NASA’s IMERG assessed the rainfall the storm generated and NASA’s Aqua satellite provided a look at the temperatures of the cloud tops to assess strength.

By Friday morning, September 6th, Hurricane Dorian was located off the coast of North Carolina, having generated tornadoes the previous day as the northern rainband came ashore in North Carolina. NASA’s satellite-based real time precipitation estimates suggest that, during the past day, most of the areas experiencing over 10 inches of rain accumulation remained offshore, while Dorian did drop heavy rain on South Carolina and North Carolina.

NASA’s IMERG showed during the past day, most of the areas experiencing over 10 inches of rain accumulation remained offshore, while Dorian did drop heavy rain on South Carolina and North Carolina. The graphic shows the distance that tropical-storm force (39 mph) winds extend from Hurricane Dorian’s low-pressure center, as estimated by the National Hurricane Center. (Visualization by NASA Goddard.)

NASA’s IMERG showed during the past day, most of the areas experiencing over 10 inches of rain accumulation remained offshore, while Dorian did drop heavy rain on South Carolina and North Carolina. The graphic shows the distance that tropical-storm force (39 mph) winds extend from Hurricane Dorian’s low-pressure center, as estimated by the National Hurricane Center. (Visualization by NASA Goddard.)

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NASA has several Instruments, Spacecraft observing Hurricane Dorian

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has several instruments and spacecraft with eyes on Hurricane Dorian, capturing different types of data from the storm.

NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), aboard the Aqua satellite, senses emitted infrared and microwave radiation from Earth. The information is used to map such atmospheric phenomena as temperature, humidity, and cloud amounts and heights.

Three images of Hurricane Dorian, as seen by a trio of NASA's Earth-observing satellites Aug. 27-29, 2019. The data sent by the spacecraft revealed in-depth views of the storm, including detailed heavy rain, cloud height and wind. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Three images of Hurricane Dorian, as seen by a trio of NASA’s Earth-observing satellites Aug. 27-29, 2019. The data sent by the spacecraft revealed in-depth views of the storm, including detailed heavy rain, cloud height and wind. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s AIRS instrument Maps Carbon Monoxide from Amazon Fires

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument, aboard the Aqua satellite, has produced new data that shows the movement high in the atmosphere of carbon monoxide associated with fires in the Amazon region of Brazil.

This time series maps carbon monoxide at an altitude of 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) from August 8th-22nd, 2019. As the series progresses, the carbon monoxide plume grows in the northwest Amazon region then drifts in a more concentrated plume toward the southeastern part of the country.

This photo shows carbon monoxide associated with fires from the Amazon region in Brazil. Made with data collected from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite, the images map carbon monoxide at approximately 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) altitude. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This photo shows carbon monoxide associated with fires from the Amazon region in Brazil. Made with data collected from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite, the images map carbon monoxide at approximately 18,000 feet (5,500 meters) altitude. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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