Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: NASA’s Langley Research Center

My NASA Data Contributes to Virtual Science Learning

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHampton, VA – With schools nationwide returning to virtual learning due to the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic, the need to find quick and educational content is paramount. One NASA initiative looks to close the science-information gap.

“Teachers now more than ever need high-quality digital resources that are aligned to standards and engage students in critical skills like data analysis and interpretation,” said Jessica Taylor, a physical scientist at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia.

The My NASA Data visualization tool, Earth System Data Explorer (ESDE), helps learners visualize complex Earth System data sets over space and time. (CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain)

The My NASA Data visualization tool, Earth System Data Explorer (ESDE), helps learners visualize complex Earth System data sets over space and time. (CC0 1.0 Universal (CC0 1.0) Public Domain)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s Scalable Traffic Management for Emergency Response Operations project

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationMountain View, CA – When a natural disaster occurs, an impressive number of participants are often needed to help with the response. Consider just the number of different aircraft that might be involved in fighting a wildfire: tankers releasing fire retardant, lead planes to guide them, helicopters dropping off field crews, aircraft from which smokejumpers arrive on the scene… And that’s to say nothing of the activity taking place on the ground.

Responding to an emergency like this – or a hurricane or search and rescue effort, to name a few – requires extensive collaboration among a host of groups that, right now, is coordinated manually under challenging conditions. This makes communication difficult.

Illustration of an Unmanned Aircraft System, or drone, in front of a smoke-filled sky. A goal of the Scalable Traffic Management for Emergency Response Operations project, or STEReO, is to make emergency response efforts more targeted and adaptable, for instance by integrating drones into wildfire fighting. (NASA / Ames Research Center / Daniel Rutter)

Illustration of an Unmanned Aircraft System, or drone, in front of a smoke-filled sky. A goal of the Scalable Traffic Management for Emergency Response Operations project, or STEReO, is to make emergency response efforts more targeted and adaptable, for instance by integrating drones into wildfire fighting. (NASA / Ames Research Center / Daniel Rutter)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA partner Blue Origin to Test Precision Lunar Landing Technologies

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – From the rim of Shackleton crater to permanently shadowed regions on the Moon, a NASA-developed sensor suite could allow robotic and crewed missions to land precisely on the lunar surface within half the distance of a football field.

Technologies to enable exact and soft landings on the Moon and other worlds will fly on Blue Origin’s next New Shepard suborbital rocket launch was supposed to launch on September 24th but had to be scrubbed. When a new launch time is announced, it will be posted to nasa.gov/live and the NASA TV Upcoming Events page.

The New Shepard booster lands after this vehicle's sixth consecutive flight December 11th, 2019. (Blue Origin)

The New Shepard booster lands after this vehicle’s sixth consecutive flight December 11th, 2019. (Blue Origin)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology Aircraft is making good progress

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationEdwards, CA – Assembly of NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology aircraft is continuing during 2020 and making good progress, despite challenges such as those imposed by the unexpected global pandemic.

NASA plans as early as 2024 to fly the X-59 over select communities on missions to gather information about how the public will react to the level of quiet supersonic flight noise the aircraft is designed to produce – if they hear anything at all.

NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology X-plane, or QueSST, is designed to fly faster than the speed of sound, without producing a loud, disruptive sonic boom, which is typically heard on the ground below aircraft flying at such speeds. Instead, with the X-59, people on the ground will hear nothing more than a quiet sonic thump – if they hear anything at all. (Lockheed Martin)

NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology X-plane, or QueSST, is designed to fly faster than the speed of sound, without producing a loud, disruptive sonic boom, which is typically heard on the ground below aircraft flying at such speeds. Instead, with the X-59, people on the ground will hear nothing more than a quiet sonic thump – if they hear anything at all. (Lockheed Martin)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA Technology designed for Lunar Landings helps Self-Driving Cars be Safer

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA is advancing a laser-based technology designed to help spacecraft land on a proverbial dime for missions to the Moon and Mars.

The technology will undergo testing on upcoming suborbital rocket launches with Blue Origin on its New Shepard rocket and ride to the Moon on several commercial landers as part of the Artemis program. Simultaneously, companies are using the technology to help self-driving cars navigate rush hour traffic on this planet.

Psionic's Doppler lidar was recently flight-tested via NASA’s Flight Opportunities program to help mature a precision landing capability for future missions to the Moon. (Lauren Hughes)

Psionic’s Doppler lidar was recently flight-tested via NASA’s Flight Opportunities program to help mature a precision landing capability for future missions to the Moon. (Lauren Hughes)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA projects examine COVID-19 and it’s effects on the Environment

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – While scientists around the world are confined to their homes during the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic, Earth observing satellites continue to orbit and send back images that reveal connections between the pandemic and the environment. “Satellites collect data all the time and don’t require us to go out anywhere,” Hannah Kerner, an assistant research professor at the University of Maryland in College Park, said.

Kerner is among eight researchers recently awarded a rapid-turnaround project grant, which supports investigators as they explore how COVID-19 Coronavirus lockdown measures are impacting the environment and how the environment can affect how the virus is spread.

Small, blocky shapes of towns, fields, and pastures surround the meandering Mississippi River, the largest river system in North America in this Landsat image. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

Small, blocky shapes of towns, fields, and pastures surround the meandering Mississippi River, the largest river system in North America in this Landsat image. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA’s ECOSTRESS observes Apple Fire in California from Space

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Ecosystem Spaceborne Thermal Radiometer Experiment on International Space Station (ECOSTRESS) captured a birds-eye view of the vast Apple fire raging in Southern California.

The wildfire began on the evening of Friday, July 31st, after two smaller fires merged and rapidly grew in the hot conditions in Riverside County, east of Los Angeles, prompting the evacuation of thousands of residents. Air temperatures have soared past 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius), stressing the vegetation and turning the area into a tinderbox. By Monday, the wildfire had exploded to over 26,000 acres.

This ECOSTRESS temperature map shows the region surrounding the Apple fire that was raging in Southern California on August 1st, 2020. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This ECOSTRESS temperature map shows the region surrounding the Apple fire that was raging in Southern California on August 1st, 2020. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


NASA creates Galactic Cosmic Ray Simulator to assess Space Travel risks of Radiation

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA has created a space radiation simulator where researchers can speed up understanding of radiation risks astronauts face, and develop techniques to reduce those risks, as they head to the Moon under the Artemis Program and prepare for future missions to Mars.

Based on new technology and an innovative design for creating a broad spectrum of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), the new space radiation simulator was developed through collaborations with world-leading space radiation researchers at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, New York.

Scientists use beams of ions to simulate cosmic rays and assess the risks of space radiation to human space travelers and equipment. (Brookhaven National Lab)

Scientists use beams of ions to simulate cosmic rays and assess the risks of space radiation to human space travelers and equipment. (Brookhaven National Lab)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA Satellite Data, Analysis Helps Make Earth Better

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says the number of illegal gold mines in the Amazon is increasing so fast that activists have turned to satellite imagery to identify them. Still, with thousands of new mines a year, the work was overwhelming scientists at Earthrise Alliance – they needed more hands on deck. That’s how ninth graders in Weston, Massachusetts, began locating illegal mining activity in Brazil’s protected Yanomami territory.

Earthrise is one of numerous organizations getting Earth-observation images, data, and analysis – much of which NASA makes available for free – into the hands of people working on sustainability projects.

A ninth grader at Weston High School in Weston, Massachusetts, scours satellite imagery to locate illegal gold mines in the Yanomami protected territory of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil. Founded by former NASA officials, Earthrise Alliance is helping students engage with emerging environmental stories through Earth-observation data. (Earthrise Education)

A ninth grader at Weston High School in Weston, Massachusetts, scours satellite imagery to locate illegal gold mines in the Yanomami protected territory of the Amazon rainforest in Brazil. Founded by former NASA officials, Earthrise Alliance is helping students engage with emerging environmental stories through Earth-observation data. (Earthrise Education)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA offers Coloring Activities for Young Students

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHampton, VA – NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia has been at the forefront of humankind’s journey into space. From the Apollo missions to the Artemis program, Langley has helped bring color to space.

Now, it’s your turn to color the galaxy with our NASA Space Crafts activity and coloring pages.

As part of the agency’s NASA@Home initiative, students from elementary school age and above can add their creativity to the people and technologies that have propelled humans to the Moon and beyond.

As part of the agency’s NASA@Home initiative, students from elementary school age and above can add their creativity to the people and technologies that have propelled humans to the Moon and beyond. (NASA's Langley Research Center)

As part of the agency’s NASA@Home initiative, students from elementary school age and above can add their creativity to the people and technologies that have propelled humans to the Moon and beyond. (NASA’s Langley Research Center)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Archives