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Topic: Ohio State University

APSU ROTC cadets honored with the University’s eighth MacArthur Award

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – The U.S. Army on Wednesday awarded the Austin Peay State University (APSU) ROTC programs the MacArthur Award, which recognizes the eight best ROTC programs in the country.

Clemmer places the MacArthur Award streamer on the Austin Peay State University Army ROTC colors, held by Master Sergeant Marcus Gurule, APSU senior military instructor. (APSU)

Clemmer places the MacArthur Award streamer on the Austin Peay State University Army ROTC colors, held by Master Sergeant Marcus Gurule, APSU senior military instructor. (APSU)

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APSU presents basketball-focused ‘Spectacle’ exhibit in time for March Madness

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – The New Gallery at Austin Peay State University, with support from The APSU Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts and the Department of Art + Design, is pleased to present Spectacle to continue an exciting 2019-2020 exhibition season. 

Austin Peay State University "Spectacle" exhibit opens Monday, February 4th. (APSU)

Austin Peay State University “Spectacle” exhibit opens Monday, February 4th. (APSU)

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NASA’s planet hunting TESS Satellite discovers Black Hole ripping apart a Star

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – For the first time, NASA’s planet-hunting Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) watched a black hole tear apart a star in a cataclysmic phenomenon called a tidal disruption event. Follow-up observations by NASA’s Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory and other facilities have produced the most detailed look yet at the early moments of one of these star-destroying occurrences.

“TESS data let us see exactly when this destructive event, named ASASSN-19bt, started to get brighter, which we’ve never been able to do before,” said Thomas Holoien, a Carnegie Fellow at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, California.

This illustration shows a tidal disruption, which occurs when a passing star gets too close to a black hole and is torn apart into a stream of gas. Some of the gas eventually settles into a structure around the black hole called an accretion disk. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center)

This illustration shows a tidal disruption, which occurs when a passing star gets too close to a black hole and is torn apart into a stream of gas. Some of the gas eventually settles into a structure around the black hole called an accretion disk. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center)

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Austin Peay State University qualifies for Collegiate Drone Racing Nationals

 

Austin Peay State University (APSU)

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – The Drone Club at Austin Peay has qualified for the Collegiate Drone Racing Association nationals – in the school’s first season of competitive racing – next month at the University of North Dakota.

APSU Drone Club to compete in Collegiate Drone Racing Association Nationals.

APSU Drone Club to compete in Collegiate Drone Racing Association Nationals.

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Austin Peay State University’s corpse flower not causing a stink yet – but it will

 

Austin Peay State University (APSU) 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – When the corpse flower blooms, it emits an intense, foul odor. “We’re used to flowers with sweet smells that attract bees and butterflies,” Dr. Carol Baskauf, Austin Peay State University (APSU) biology professor, said.

“The nickname for this plant is ‘corpse flower’ because it smells like rotting, dead meat. It stinks terribly,” stated Baskauf.

Austin Peay State University's towering corpse flower plant should bloom in four to six years. (APSU)

Austin Peay State University’s towering corpse flower plant should bloom in four to six years. (APSU)

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American Heart Association reports Breast Cancer Treatments may increase the risk of Heart Disease

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Breast cancer patients may be at an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases including heart failure and may benefit from a treatment approach that weighs the benefits of specific therapies against potential damage to the heart, according to a new scientific statement from the American Heart Association published in its journal Circulation.

The statement is an overview of what we currently know about risk factors common to both heart disease and breast cancer, the potential heart damage from some breast cancer treatments, and suggested strategies to prevent or minimize the damage.

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer. (American Heart Association)

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APSU’s Zone 3 Fall 2017 Reading Series to feature Fiction, Poetry and Film

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Zone 3, the Austin Peay State University Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts’ literary journal, welcomes a diverse group of writers, filmmakers and creative minds for its Fall 2017 Zone 3 Reading Series.

Steven Sherrill will travel to campus on September 19th, at 4:00pm to give a reading of his fiction.

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APSU PeayClipse talk on “Telling Time and Telling Tales: Eclipses in Ancient Greece” to be featured at Clarksville’s Movies in the Park

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – As part of the ongoing PeayClipse lecture series, Austin Peay State University faculty members Tim and Mary Winters will present a talk titled, “Telling Time and Telling Tales: Eclipses in Ancient Greece,” at 7:00pm on July 15th, 2017 during the city of Clarksville’s Movies in the Park Series, at Heritage Park.

They will talk before that evening’s featured film, “Finding Dory.”

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NASA reports discovery of Hottest Planet so far

 

Written with Pam Frost Gorder

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – A newly discovered Jupiter-like world is so hot, it’s being vaporized by its own star.

With a dayside temperature of more than 7,800 degrees Fahrenheit (4,600 Kelvin), KELT-9b is a planet that is hotter than most stars. But its blue A-type star, called KELT-9, is even hotter — in fact, it is probably unraveling the planet through evaporation.

“This is the hottest gas giant planet that has ever been discovered,” said Scott Gaudi, astronomy professor at The Ohio State University in Columbus, who led a study on the topic. He worked on this study while on sabbatical at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California.

This artist's concept shows planet KELT-9b orbiting its host star, KELT-9. It is the hottest gas giant planet discovered so far. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This artist’s concept shows planet KELT-9b orbiting its host star, KELT-9. It is the hottest gas giant planet discovered so far. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes observe Dying Star reborn into a Black Hole

 

Written by Elizabeth Landau
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Astronomers have watched as a massive, dying star was likely reborn as a black hole. It took the combined power of the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), and NASA’s Hubble and Spitzer space telescopes to go looking for remnants of the vanquished star, only to find that it disappeared out of sight.

It went out with a whimper instead of a bang.

The star, which was 25 times as massive as our sun, should have exploded in a very bright supernova. Instead, it fizzled out — and then left behind a black hole.

This illustration shows the final stages in the life of a supermassive star that fails to explode as a supernova, but instead implodes to form a black hole. (NASA/ESA/P. Jeffries (STScI))

This illustration shows the final stages in the life of a supermassive star that fails to explode as a supernova, but instead implodes to form a black hole. (NASA/ESA/P. Jeffries (STScI))

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