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Topic: Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth

New Tennessee Child Well-Being Report Focuses on Challenges Rural Counties Face

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – The differing challenges faced by Tennessee’s urban and rural counties, as well as those that are shared, are explored in KIDS COUNT: The State of the Child in Tennessee.

This report, produced by the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth, the Annie E. Casey Foundation Tennessee KIDS COUNT® partner, is released in conjunction with county profiles for all 95 Tennessee counties. The profiles include substantial county-level data and county ranks in important areas affecting child development: economic well-being, education, health and family, and community.

The profiles also list county measures on 38 indicators.

Tennessee map with Tennessee county child well-being ranks shown by quintile.

Tennessee map with Tennessee county child well-being ranks shown by quintile.

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Montgomery County ranks 6th in Tennessee for Child Well-Being

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – At 6th, Montgomery County is among the top Tennessee counties in child well-being according to a report produced by the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth, the Annie E. Casey Foundation Tennessee KIDS COUNT® partner.

Some of the county’s strongest rankings include the lowest rate of children who lack health insurance in the state and comparatively high percentages of 3rd to 8th grade students who demonstrate proficiency on TNReady reading and math tests.

The county’s biggest opportunities for improvement are high housing costs and one of the higher percentages of student suspensions from school.

Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth ranks Montgomery County 6th for Child Well-Being

Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth ranks Montgomery County 6th for Child Well-Being

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Tennessee Shows Reduction in the Number of Children Living in Concentrated Poverty

 

One of 29 States Nationwide to Show Progress in Child Poverty Rate According to New Data Snapshot from the Annie E. Casey Foundation

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – The percentage of Tennessee children living in areas of concentrated poverty fell 7% between 2013 and 2017, according to “Children Living in High Poverty, Low-Opportunity Neighborhoods,” a new KIDS COUNT® data snapshot released today by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Using the latest data available from the U.S. Census Bureau, the snapshot examines where concentrated poverty has worsened across the country despite a long period of national economic expansion.

Living in a neighborhood with a high level of concentrated poverty, in addition to putting children at risk from environmental exposure and reduced opportunities, can cause chronic stress and trauma.

In Tennessee 13% of kids are growing up in concentrated poverty. «Read the rest of this article»

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Austin Peay State University to host 7th annual Joint Conference on Juvenile Justice, April 8th

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – On Saturday, April 8th, 2017, the Montgomery County Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) Task Force, the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth, the MerryInGOD Foundation and Austin Peay State University will present the 7th Annual Joint Conference on Juvenile Justice.

Austin Peay State University's Morgan University Center. (APSU)

Austin Peay State University’s Morgan University Center. (APSU)

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2015 Children’s Advocacy Days to be held March 10th-11th

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – The 2015 Children’s Advocacy Days will be March 10th-11th at War Memorial Auditorium. The event gathers child advocates from across the state to learn more about policies related to children and meet with state leaders. The theme of the 2015 Children’s Advocacy Days is “Everyday Superheroes…Every Day!” and celebrates the efforts of those who work every day to make Tennessee children’s lives better.

Dr. Kenneth Minkoff of Harvard University will speak on Wednesday. He is one of the nation’s leading experts on integrated treatment of individuals with co-occurring psychiatric and substance (dual diagnosis) disorders.

2015 Children’s Advocacy Days «Read the rest of this article»

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Kids Count State of the Child: Are Tennessee Children Prepared to Learn?

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – At the beginning of the school year, children wait for the school bus or in the drop-off lane for their first experience of school. Many of them arrive with the skills they need to learn. Many, however, arrive with gaps in the foundation for learning that must be filled so they can make the most of their experience.

Children do not enter school as blank slates, each equally impressionable to educators’ efforts. Children enter school with figurative backpacks. Some children come with an eagerness to learn, good health, emotional security and a sense of safety fostered by a supportive family and community. Others come without important tools for learning and already weighed down by the trauma of poverty, hunger, violence or abuse.

Kids Count State of the Child in Tennessee «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Improves in National KIDS COUNT Ranking on Child Well-Being

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – Tennessee is 36th this year in the annual KIDS COUNT National Data Book ranking on child well-being, better than its 39th ranking in 2013. The state is among the five states with the biggest improvements in overall rankings from 2013 to 2014.

The Data Book rates states on four domains: Economic Well-Being, Education, Health, and Family and Community. Each domain is comprised of four measures. When the most recently available data were compared to those from 2005, Tennessee improved on 10 of the 16 measures; worsened on five and remained the same on one, paralleling national changes.

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Tennessee Fourth Graders’ National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) Reading Scores Improved over 10-Year Period

 

State of TennesseeNashville, TN – Fourth grade reading scores of Tennessee students improved more over the past 10 years than those of students in most other states, a new data snapshot on education finds.

The report, KIDS COUNT Data Snapshot: Early Reading Proficiency in the United States, compares 2003 and 2013 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) fourth grade reading scores.

It was issued by the Annie E. Casey Foundation KIDS COUNT Program. «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam proclaims October 17th “Lights On Afterschool Day”

 

Lights On AfterschoolNashville, TN – Tennessee Governor Bill Haslam has named October 17th as Lights On Afterschool Day in Tennessee to recognize the state’s afterschool programs’ role in enhancing learning and keeping children safe and less likely to engage in risky behavior.

Lights On Afterschool Poster «Read the rest of this article»

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Tennessee Ranks 39th in National KIDS COUNT Child Well-Being Report

 

Tennessee Commission on Children and YouthNashville, TN – Tennessee is 39th in the Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 2013 National KIDS COUNT Data Book ranking of child well-being released today.

Rankings on 16 indicators are clustered in four domains — Economic Well-Being, Education, Health, and Family and Community. Tennessee improved slightly on two domains, held steady on one, and dropped on another.

“Child well-being is a barometer of the current and future well-being of the state,” said Linda O’Neal, executive director of the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth, state affiliate of the KIDS COUNT program, “and while we are disappointed Tennessee’s 2013 composite ranking dropped from 36th in 2012 after three years of ‘best ever’ state rankings, we are pleased to see progress in several indicators. «Read the rest of this article»

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