Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Tohoku-Oki Japan

NASA reports Crowdsourced Smartphone Data could give advance notice for People in Earthquake Zones

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Smartphones and other personal electronic devices could, in regions where they are in widespread use, function as early warning systems for large earthquakes, according to newly reported research.

This technology could serve regions of the world that cannot afford higher quality, but more expensive, conventional earthquake early warning systems, or could contribute to those systems.

The study, led by scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), found that the sensors in smartphones and similar devices could be used to build earthquake warning systems.

Cell phones can detect ground motion and warn others before strong shaking arrives. ("Everyone Check Your Phones - NYC" by Jim Pennucci, used under CC BY.)

Cell phones can detect ground motion and warn others before strong shaking arrives. (“Everyone Check Your Phones – NYC” by Jim Pennucci, used under CC BY.)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 

NASA Finds Japan Tsunami Waves Merged, Doubling Power

 

Written by Alan Buisl, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
and Steve Cole, NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA and Ohio State University researchers have discovered the major tsunami generated by the March 2011 Tohoku-Oki quake centered off northeastern Japan was a long-hypothesized “merging tsunami.”  The tsunami doubled in intensity over rugged ocean ridges, amplifying its destructive power at landfall.

Data from NASA and European radar satellites captured at least two wave fronts that day. The fronts merged to form a single, double-high wave far out at sea. This wave was capable of traveling long distances without losing power. Ocean ridges and undersea mountain chains pushed the waves together along certain directions from the tsunami’s origin.

The NASA/French Space Agency Jason-1 satellite (top left) passed over the tsunami 7 hours and 30 minutes after the earthquake and was able to 'see' a large wave resulting from merging tsunami jets. The NASA/European Jason-2 satellite (lower left) passed over the region 8 hours and 20 minutes after the earthquake and observed the normal tsunami wave. In the figures on the right, the satellite-observed tsunami height data (red and pink lines) was confirmed by JPL computer model predictions (black lines) based on 1,200 measurements of ground displacement from Japanese GPS stations. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Ohio State University)

The NASA/French Space Agency Jason-1 satellite (top left) passed over the tsunami 7 hours and 30 minutes after the earthquake and was able to 'see' a large wave resulting from merging tsunami jets. The NASA/European Jason-2 satellite (lower left) passed over the region 8 hours and 20 minutes after the earthquake and observed the normal tsunami wave. In the figures on the right, the satellite-observed tsunami height data (red and pink lines) was confirmed by JPL computer model predictions (black lines) based on 1,200 measurements of ground displacement from Japanese GPS stations. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Ohio State University)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Archives