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Topic: U.S. Forest Service

NASA’s Scalable Traffic Management for Emergency Response Operations project

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationMountain View, CA – When a natural disaster occurs, an impressive number of participants are often needed to help with the response. Consider just the number of different aircraft that might be involved in fighting a wildfire: tankers releasing fire retardant, lead planes to guide them, helicopters dropping off field crews, aircraft from which smokejumpers arrive on the scene… And that’s to say nothing of the activity taking place on the ground.

Responding to an emergency like this – or a hurricane or search and rescue effort, to name a few – requires extensive collaboration among a host of groups that, right now, is coordinated manually under challenging conditions. This makes communication difficult.

Illustration of an Unmanned Aircraft System, or drone, in front of a smoke-filled sky. A goal of the Scalable Traffic Management for Emergency Response Operations project, or STEReO, is to make emergency response efforts more targeted and adaptable, for instance by integrating drones into wildfire fighting. (NASA / Ames Research Center / Daniel Rutter)

Illustration of an Unmanned Aircraft System, or drone, in front of a smoke-filled sky. A goal of the Scalable Traffic Management for Emergency Response Operations project, or STEReO, is to make emergency response efforts more targeted and adaptable, for instance by integrating drones into wildfire fighting. (NASA / Ames Research Center / Daniel Rutter)

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NASA projects examine COVID-19 and it’s effects on the Environment

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – While scientists around the world are confined to their homes during the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic, Earth observing satellites continue to orbit and send back images that reveal connections between the pandemic and the environment. “Satellites collect data all the time and don’t require us to go out anywhere,” Hannah Kerner, an assistant research professor at the University of Maryland in College Park, said.

Kerner is among eight researchers recently awarded a rapid-turnaround project grant, which supports investigators as they explore how COVID-19 Coronavirus lockdown measures are impacting the environment and how the environment can affect how the virus is spread.

Small, blocky shapes of towns, fields, and pastures surround the meandering Mississippi River, the largest river system in North America in this Landsat image. (NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

Small, blocky shapes of towns, fields, and pastures surround the meandering Mississippi River, the largest river system in North America in this Landsat image. (NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center/USGS)

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Lamar Alexander says Most Important Conservation Law in a Half Century Would Not Have Happened Without President Donald Trump

 

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) today joined President Donald Trump at the White House for the signing of the Great American Outdoors Act – bipartisan legislation Alexander sponsored that passed the Senate on June 17th, 2020 by a 73-25 vote and the House of Representatives on July 22nd, 2020 by a 310-107 vote.

The new law gives the biggest funding boost to the United States’ 419 national parks in half a century. The legislation incudes the “Restore Our Parks Act” that Alexander first introduced in 2018 and permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which President Ronald Reagan’s Commission on Americans Outdoors recommended in 1985 when Alexander was its chairman.

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

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Lamar Alexander says Most Important Conservation Legislation in Half a Century Heads to President’s Desk

 

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) today released the following statement after the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Great American Outdoors Act by an overwhelming 310-107 bipartisan vote. The Senate passed the legislation 73-25 on June 17th, 2020 and the bill now heads to the president’s desk to be signed into law.

The legislation includes the “Restore Our Parks Act” that Alexander first introduced in 2018 and permanent funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which President Reagan’s ’s Commission on Americans Outdoors recommended in 1985 when Alexander was its chairman.

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

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Lamar Alexander says Over 800 Conservation Groups Support Legislation to Cut the National Parks Maintenance Backlog in Half

 

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – The U.S. Senate last week passed the Great American Outdoors Act — the most important conservation legislation in half a century — by an overwhelming 73-25 bipartisan vote.

The legislation includes Lamar Alexander’s bill to restore the country’s 419 national parks and cut in half the national parks’ $12 billion deferred maintenance backlog. The bill also fully funds the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) permanently, a goal of Congress since 1964.

This bipartisan solution to restore America’s national parks gained the support of more than 800 conservation groups, including:

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

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Lamar Alexander says U.S. Senate is Considering the Most Important Conservation Legislation in 50 Years

 

U.S. SenateWashington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.) today said legislation the Senate is considering this week – the Great American Outdoors Act –  is the biggest boost to our national parks in 50 years.

The legislation fully funds the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) permanently, a goal of Congress since it was first passed in 1964, and includes Alexander’s bill to restore our country’s national parks and cut in half our parks’ $12 billion deferred maintenance backlog.

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander

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Land Between the Lakes Expands List of ?Recreation Sites Temporarily Shut Down

 

Land Between the Lakes - LBLLand Between the Lakes, KY/TN – To protect public health and align with federal, state, and local guidance to the Coronavirus (COVID-19), Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area (LBL) officials have announced the temporary shutdown of facilities, campgrounds, and developed camping areas for the safety of visitors and staff.

These measures are temporary but effective immediately. A date for reopening recreation areas is currently undetermined.

LBL's Homeplace 1850s Working Farm and Living History Museum temporary shutdown.

LBL’s Homeplace 1850s Working Farm and Living History Museum temporary shutdown.

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Land Between the Lakes announces Changes Scheduled for this Season

 

Land Between the Lakes - LBLLand Between the Lakes, KY/TN – The U.S. Forest Service plans to implement fee and policy changes for some uses and attractions beginning March 1st, 2020 to meet changing visitor needs at Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area (LBL).

Some changes will begin March 1st while others are set to begin later in the tourism season. A complete list of current rates and hours are available online at www.landbetweenthelakes.us/seendo/camping/rates-hours/

Horses have the right of way at Wrangler's Campground at Land Between the Lakes. (LBL)

Horses have the right of way at Wrangler’s Campground at Land Between the Lakes. (LBL)

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Land Between the Lakes Storm Debris being cleared by U.S. Forest Service

 

Land Between the Lakes - LBLLand Between the Lakes, KY/TN – While the U.S. Forest Service and electric company crews continue removing storm damage from power lines, roads and campgrounds at Land Between the Lakes (LBL), certain areas will be closed for several days.

Three severe storms with high winds, heavy rains and lightening crossed Land Between the Lakes beginning Friday. Forest Service crews began clearing roads on Friday but many trees continue to fall and create dangerous situations.

Downed tree blocking a road at Land Between the Lakes. (LBL)

Downed tree blocking a road at Land Between the Lakes. (LBL)

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Land Between the Lakes closes many areas due to Storm Damage

 

Land Between the Lakes - LBLLand Between the Lakes , KY/TN – The storm Friday created downed trees and power lines blown over at Land Between the Lakes. The U.S. Forest Service continues to assist visitors and address the hazards.

Forest Service crews began accessing damages at 7:00pm Friday as a southeast moving storm brought high winds, lightening and heavy rains Friday evening. Land Between the Lakes staff ask people to postpone visits to the area while crews locate and clear hazards.

Downed tree blocking a road at Land Between the Lakes. (LBL)

Downed tree blocking a road at Land Between the Lakes. (LBL)

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