Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: UAV

Department of Defense releases Estimated Impacts of Sequestration-Level Funding Report

 

United States Department of Defense - DoDWashington, D.C. – On Tuesday, April 15th, 2014, the Department of Defense released a report that documents the damaging cuts to military forces, modernization, and readiness that will be required if defense budgets are held at sequester-levels in the years beyond fiscal 2015.  This report fulfills a commitment made by Secretary Chuck Hagel to provide details on the effects of these undesirable budget cuts.

As the report says, sequester level budgets would result in continued force-level cuts across the military services.

The Army would be reduced to 420,000 active duty soldiers along with 315,000 in the Guard and 185,000 in the Reserve. «Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

Fort Campbell’s 3rd Brigade Combat Team’s UAS teams enhance skills through field training

 

Written by Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton
3rd Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division

Fort Campbell KY - 101st Airborne DivisionRakkasanFort Campbell, KY – The Tactical Unmanned Aerial Systems operators and maintainers assigned to TUAS platoon, 3rd Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), have spent several weeks in the field to advance their capabilities as the UAS asset for the Rakkasans.

“This is our third week out here for our field exercise,” said Spc. John Alexander, a TUAS operator assigned to the TUAS Platoon, “This field exercise was designed to increase our readiness level by incorporating combat mission simulations.”

Spc. Thomas Olsen, a Tactical Unmanned Aerial System maintainer assigned to the TUAS Platoon, Company B, 3rd Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team "Rakkasans," 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), calls in another systems check before loading the Shadow Unmanned Aerial System on the launcher at Fort Campbell, Ky., Sept. 9, 2013. Olsen and the rest of his platoon spent three weeks in the field to advance their skills and to increase their readiness level so they are ready to assist the brigade on future missions. (Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton/U.S.Army)

Spc. Thomas Olsen, a Tactical Unmanned Aerial System maintainer assigned to the TUAS Platoon, Company B, 3rd Special Troops Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team “Rakkasans,” 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), calls in another systems check before loading the Shadow Unmanned Aerial System on the launcher at Fort Campbell, Ky., Sept. 9, 2013. Olsen and the rest of his platoon spent three weeks in the field to advance their skills and to increase their readiness level so they are ready to assist the brigade on future missions. (Spc. Brian Smith-Dutton/U.S.Army)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: News | No Comments
 

NASA to use RQ-14 Dragon Eye unmanned aircraft to study Costa Rica’s active Turrialba Volcano Plume

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Studying volcanos can be hazardous work, both for researchers and aircraft. To penetrate such dangerous airspace, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), especially those with electric engines that ingest little contaminated air, are an emerging and effective way to gather crucial data about volcanic ash and gases.

Last month, a team of NASA researchers deployed three repurposed military UAVs with special instruments into and above the noxious sulfur dioxide plume of Costa Rica’s active Turrialba volcano, near San Jose.

NASA researchers modified three repurposed Aerovironment RQ-14 Dragon Eye unmanned aerial vehicles acquired from the United States Marine Corps to study the sulfur dioxide plume of Costa Rica's Turrialba volcano. The project is designed to improve the remote sensing capability of satellites and computer models of volcanic activity. (Image credit: Google/NASA/Matthew Fladeland)

NASA researchers modified three repurposed Aerovironment RQ-14 Dragon Eye unmanned aerial vehicles acquired from the United States Marine Corps to study the sulfur dioxide plume of Costa Rica’s Turrialba volcano. The project is designed to improve the remote sensing capability of satellites and computer models of volcanic activity. (Image credit: Google/NASA/Matthew Fladeland)

«Read the rest of this article»

Sections: Technology | No Comments
 



  • Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On TwitterVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On YoutubeCheck Our FeedVisit Us On Instagram
  • Personal Controls

    Archives