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Topic: University of Connecticut

APSU graduates Khari Turner, Ashanté Kindle to spend summer at renowned art institute

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Two recent Austin Peay State University (APSU) graduates will step through the doors of a prestigious art institute – the Visual Arts at Chautauqua Institution – in western New York later this week.

Khari Turner is one of two Austin Peay State University art graduates attending the Chautauqua Institution School of Art this summer. (APSU)

Khari Turner is one of two Austin Peay State University art graduates attending the Chautauqua Institution School of Art this summer. (APSU)

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Austin Peay State University’s Phi Alpha Theta wins Best Chapter Award, APSU Student Organization of the Year

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Assuming Austin Peay State University’s Phi Alpha Theta National Honor Society (PAT) continues down the path it’s followed for the past nine years, the University’s award-winning history honor society chapter, Theta-Delta, could very soon be celebrating “one for the thumb.”

That’s because Theta-Delta is once again home to the Nels A. Cleven Award for Best Chapter of the Year, Division IV. The award is given annually to the best chapter in the nation for the organization’s Division IV, which consists of schools with between 10,001-15,000 students.

Austin Peay State University’s Phi Alpha Theta National Honor Society

Austin Peay State University’s Phi Alpha Theta National Honor Society

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NASA prepares for future Satellite by studying Coral Reefs of Hawaii

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA pulled off a scientific double play in Hawaii this winter, using the same instruments and aircraft to study both volcanoes and coral reefs. Besides helping scientists understand these two unique environments better, the data will be used to evaluate the possibility of preparing a potential future NASA satellite that would monitor ecosystem changes and natural hazards.

The advantages of studying active volcanoes from the air rather than the ground are obvious. Coral reefs may not offer the same risks in a close encounter that volcanoes do, but there’s another good reason to study them by remote sensing: they’re dotted across thousands of square miles of the globe.

NASA coral reef studies in Hawaii this winter will help scientists understand this unique environment. (NOAA)

NASA coral reef studies in Hawaii this winter will help scientists understand this unique environment. (NOAA)

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NASA’s laser remote-sensing Lidar technology used to uncover History

 

Written by Naomi Seck
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – Some 10,500 years ago, hunters gathered each year near the Beaver River in what is now western Oklahoma. There, they funneled bison into narrow, dead-end arroyos — steep gullies cut into the hillside by the river — where they killed them en masse, sliced off the choicest meat and left behind piles of skeletons.

Walk through western Oklahoma today and there is little visible evidence of that ancient landscape, much less the hunting expeditions it hosted. Few bison remain, and dirt and rocks have filled in many of the arroyos.

An archaeological team led by University of Oklahoma’s Lee Bement excavates a 10,500-year-old bison kill site near the Beaver River. Using lidar scanning, the team was able to narrow down sites to search further for prehistoric artifacts. (Lee Bement)

An archaeological team led by University of Oklahoma’s Lee Bement excavates a 10,500-year-old bison kill site near the Beaver River. Using lidar scanning, the team was able to narrow down sites to search further for prehistoric artifacts. (Lee Bement)

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Austin Peay State University’s Phi Alpha Theta wins eighth Best Chapter Award

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – While much of America focused on each word said during the recent first presidential debate, something else was gnawing at the back of the mind of Austin Peay State University professor of history, Dr. Minoa Uffelman.

For the last seven years, the University’s Phi Alpha Theta National Honor Society (PAT), which Uffelman advises, has been recognized each fall with the national Best Chapter Award, but September was drawing to a close without word on a possible eighth consecutive award.

Austin Peay President Dr. Alisa White with the University's Phi Alpha Theta National Honor Society (PAT).

Austin Peay President Dr. Alisa White with the University’s Phi Alpha Theta National Honor Society (PAT).

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NASA’s Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer (PRISM) can observe Coastal Waters in detail never before possible

 

Written by Carol Rasmussen
NASA Earth Science News Team

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – A coastal scene with deep blue seas and a coral reef is beautiful to look at, but if you try to record the scene with a camera or a scientific instrument, the results are almost always disappointing. Most cameras can’t “see” underwater objects in such scenes because they’re so dim and wash out the glaring seashore.

These problems don’t just ruin vacation photos. They’re a serious hindrance for scientists who need images of the coastline to study how these ecosystems are being affected by climate change, development and other hazards.

To the rescue: the new Portable Remote Imaging Spectrometer, created at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California. PRISM is an airborne instrument designed to observe hard-to-see coastal water phenomena.

PRISM was designed to focus on hard-to-see phenomena in difficult coastal light conditions. (Flickr user Ken Lund, CC BY-SA 2.0)

PRISM was designed to focus on hard-to-see phenomena in difficult coastal light conditions. (Flickr user Ken Lund, CC BY-SA 2.0)

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NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory studies Comet ISON and Comet PanSTARRS

 

Written by Molly Porter
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHuntsville, AL – For millennia, people on Earth have watched comets in the sky. Many ancient cultures saw comets as the harbingers of doom, but today scientists know that comets are really frozen balls of dust, gas, and rock and may have been responsible for delivering water to planets like Earth billions of years ago.

While comets are inherently interesting, they can also provide information about other aspects of our Solar System. More specifically, comets can be used as laboratories to study the behavior of the stream of particles flowing away from the Sun, known as the solar wind.

Recently, astronomers announced the results of a study using data collected with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory of two comets — C/2012 S1 (also known as “Comet ISON”) and C/2011 S4 (“Comet PanSTARRS”).

The Comets ISON and PanSTARRS in optical images taken by an astrophotographer, with insets showing the X-ray images from Chandra. (X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ . of CT/B.Snios et al, Optical: DSS, Damian Peach ( damianpeach.com ))

The Comets ISON and PanSTARRS in optical images taken by an astrophotographer, with insets showing the X-ray images from Chandra. (X-ray: NASA/CXC/Univ . of CT/B.Snios et al, Optical: DSS, Damian Peach ( damianpeach.com ))

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Clarksville’s Bashaara Graves shines in USA Women’s U19 World Championship

 

USA BasketballLanzarote, Canary Islands – Following a week-long training camp in Colorado Springs, CO, the 2013 USA Women’s U19 World Championship Team (1-0) got its first taste of competition in the 2013 Lanzarote International Invitational, earning a 71-66 exhibition game victory over a tough Australian (0-1) squad.

The game was played on Friday night at the Teguise Arena in Lanzarote. The round-robin tournament continues on Saturday when Australia and Canada square off at 1:00pm ET (6:00pm in Lanzarote) and the U.S. takes on Spain at 3:00pm ET (8:00pm in Lanzarote).

USA Basketball - Bashaara Graves

USA Basketball – Bashaara Graves

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