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Austin Peay State University to offer “Sociology of COVID-19” class

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University (APSU) says that in the last few months, the new COVID-19 Coronavirus has infected 5.6 million people worldwide, resulting in more than 350,000 deaths.

At the same time, as governments and businesses have shut down – sometimes leading to protests and violent altercations – the pandemic has revealed deep fissures in modern society.

Austin Peay State University's Dr. Jonniann Butterfield. (APSU)

Austin Peay State University’s Dr. Jonniann Butterfield. (APSU)

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APSU’s ‘phage hunters’ join front lines of medical research

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – The 10 Austin Peay State University (APSU) students in Dr. Sergei Markov’s junior- and senior-level biology classes this semester are taking advantage of a unique research opportunity that could help lead to medical breakthroughs.

They’re participating in Science Education Alliance-Phage Hunters Advancing Genomics and Evolutionary Science (SEA-PHAGES), a yearlong laboratory course in which students discover, isolate and analyze bacteria-infecting viruses called bacteriophages. The bacteriophages more commonly are called phages, and the students are phage hunters.

Heath Simpson shows his Petri dish during a recent phage hunter class at Austin Peay State University. (APSU)

Heath Simpson shows his Petri dish during a recent phage hunter class at Austin Peay State University. (APSU)

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American Heart Association reports Brain Activity may be predictor of Stress-Related Cardiovascular Risk

 

American Heart Association Rapid Access Journal Report

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – The brain may have a distinctive activity pattern during stressful events that predicts bodily reactions, such as rises in blood pressure that increase risk for cardiovascular disease, according to new proof-of-concept research in the Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

The new research, the largest brain-imaging study of cardiovascular stress physiology to date, introduced a brain-based explanation of why stress might influence a person’s heart health.   

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

A pattern of brain activity that occurs during psychological stress may predict bodily reactions, such as surges in our blood pressure, that increase risk for cardiovascular disease. (American Heart Association)

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American Heart Association says Eating in Social Settings may be greatest temptation for Dieters

 

American Heart Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationPortland, OR – For people trying to lose weight or maintain a lower body weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting, according to research presented at the American Heart Association’s Epidemiology and Prevention / Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health 2017 Scientific Sessions.

The 12-month study of 150 people (90 percent women) used smartphones and a custom-developed application to capture data as dieters moved through everyday life.

For people trying to lose or maintain weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting.

For people trying to lose or maintain weight, the temptation to overeat is stronger when eating in a social setting.

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Exercise can significantly improve Brain Function after Stroke according to American Heart Association

 

American Stroke Association Meeting Report

American Heart AssociationHouston, TXStructured exercise training can significantly improve brain function in stroke survivors, according to research presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2017.

Stroke is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, and the leading cause of long-term disability. Studies estimate that up to 85 percent of people who suffer a stroke will have cognitive impairments, including deficits in executive function, attention and working memory.

Structured physical activity training after a stroke effectively improves brain function. (American Heart Association)

Structured physical activity training after a stroke effectively improves brain function. (American Heart Association)

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Austin Peay State University to induct Four former Stars into APSU Athletics Hall of Fame

 

Austin Peay Sports Information

Austin Peay State University Sports - APSU - Governors - Lady GovsClarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University has announced four new members will be inducted into its Athletics Hall of Fame, February 13th, 2016.

Rowdy Hardy, the winningest pitcher in Governors baseball history and two-time Collegiate Baseball All-American selection; Stephanie Champine, a two-time all-region volleyball player and 2009 OVC Player of the Year; Carrie Burggraf, a five-time Ohio Valley Conference pole vault champion and two-time OVC Scholar Athlete, have been selected to the Athletics Hall of Fame.

Austin Peay to induct Rowdy Hardy, Stephanie Champine, Carrie Burggraf, and Paul Aaron into the APSU Athletics Hall of Fame. (APSU Sports Information)

Austin Peay to induct Rowdy Hardy, Stephanie Champine, Carrie Burggraf, and Paul Aaron into the APSU Athletics Hall of Fame. (APSU Sports Information)

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American Heart Association says Mobile Technology may help people improve Health Behaviors

 

American Heart AssociationDallas, TX – Smartphone applications and wearable sensors have the potential to help people make healthier lifestyle choices, but scientific evidence of mobile health technologies’ effectiveness for reducing risk factors for heart disease and stroke is limited, according to a scientific statement from the American Heart Association, published in the association’s journal Circulation.

The new statement reviewed the small body of published, peer-reviewed studies about the effectiveness of mobile health technologies (mHealth) for managing weight, increasing physical activity, quitting smoking and controlling high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

Vegetables at the market. (American Heart Association)

Vegetables at the market. (American Heart Association)

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APSU to have Two award-winning poets read on Thursday, February 6th

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – A few years ago, the award-winning poet Toi Derricotte read a collection of poems by Austin Peay State University alumnus Jeff Hardin, and she was immediately struck by the simple power and beauty of his words.

“Jeff Hardin is extremely sophisticated, mature and knows exactly what he is doing,” she said. «Read the rest of this article»

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NASA reports astronomers use Suzaku Satellite to gain better understanding of Supernovas

 

Written by Francis Reddy
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – An exploding star observed in 1604 by the German astronomer Johannes Kepler held a greater fraction of heavy elements than the sun, according to an analysis of X-ray observations from the Japan-led Suzaku satellite.

The findings will help astronomers better understand the diversity of type Ia supernovae, an important class of stellar explosion used in probing the distant universe.

This composite of images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of Kepler's supernova in low (red), intermediate (green) and high-energy (blue) X-rays. The background is an optical star field taken from the Digitized Sky Survey. The distance to the object is uncertain, with estimates ranging from 13,000 to 23,000 light-years, but recent studies favor the maximum range. This image spans 12 arcminutes or about 80 light-years at the greatest distance. *Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NCSU/M.Burkey et al.; optical: DSS)

This composite of images from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory shows the remnant of Kepler’s supernova in low (red), intermediate (green) and high-energy (blue) X-rays. The background is an optical star field taken from the Digitized Sky Survey. The distance to the object is uncertain, with estimates ranging from 13,000 to 23,000 light-years, but recent studies favor the maximum range. This image spans 12 arcminutes or about 80 light-years at the greatest distance. *Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/NCSU/M.Burkey et al.; optical: DSS)

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