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Topic: University of Texas at San Antonio

New liaison to help Austin Peay State University connect with Tennessee’s Japanese-owned companies

 

Austin Peay State University - APSUClarksville, TN – Earlier this year, Yoshio Koyama, a retired businessman from Japan, set up his new office in Austin Peay State University’s Harned Hall. During the semester, he’s taught a few language and culture classes, but Koyama isn’t a college professor.

Retired businessman Yoshio Koyama is a liaison provided by The Japan Foundation to help forge relationships between APSU and Japanese businesses.

Retired businessman Yoshio Koyama is a liaison provided by The Japan Foundation to help forge relationships between APSU and Japanese businesses.

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NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy discovers thick dust surrounding active Black Holes

 

SOFIA Science Center
NASA Ames Research Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationMoffett Field, CA – Researchers at the University of Texas San Antonio using observations from NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA, found that the dust surrounding active, ravenous black holes is much more compact than previously thought.

Most, if not all, large galaxies contain a supermassive black hole at their centers. Many of these black holes are relatively quiet and inactive, like the one at the center of our Milky Way galaxy. However, some supermassive black holes are currently consuming significant amounts of material that are being drawn into them, resulting in the emission of huge amounts of energy. These active black holes are called active galactic nuclei.

Artist illustration of the thick ring of dust that can obscure the energetic processes that occur near the supermassive black hole of an active galactic nuclei. The SOFIA studies suggest that the dust distribution is about 30 percent smaller than previously thought. (NASA/SOFIA/Lynette Cook)

Artist illustration of the thick ring of dust that can obscure the energetic processes that occur near the supermassive black hole of an active galactic nuclei. The SOFIA studies suggest that the dust distribution is about 30 percent smaller than previously thought. (NASA/SOFIA/Lynette Cook)

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NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) begins fourth year of studying objects in Space

 

Written by Nicholas A. Veronico
SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationMoffett Field, CA – NASA’s “flying” telescope, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) aboard a highly modified Boeing 747SP jetliner, began its fourth series of science flights on February 3rd, 2016.

This operational period, known as “Cycle 4,” is a one-year-long observing period in which SOFIA is scheduled for 106 flights between now and the end of January 2017.

NASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) takes off from Palmdale, California at sunset. SOFIA is a partnership of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR); NASA and DLR have collaborated on a range of activities and signed agreements on June 16 to work together to reduce aircraft noise and advance research into rotorcraft. (NASA / Greg Perryman)

NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) takes off from Palmdale, California at sunset. SOFIA is a partnership of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR); NASA and DLR have collaborated on a range of activities and signed agreements on June 16 to work together to reduce aircraft noise and advance research into rotorcraft. (NASA / Greg Perryman)

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Instant Peay Play: Hunt for next APSU Governors Athletics Director nearing an end

 

Legends Bank, Clarksville TNClarksville, TN – For the second time in just over two years it looks like the search for a new Austin Peay State University athletics director is coming to a close, with the announcement by the University that it was narrowed the search to four candidates.

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APSU announces final four candidates for Athletics Director position

 

Austin Peay State University Sports - APSU - Governors - Lady GovsClarksville, TN – Austin Peay State University has narrowed its search for a new athletics director down to four strong candidates, and the University will begin interviewing the candidates in early July. APSU began looking for a new AD in April when Derek van der Merwe was promoted from that position to vice president of Advancement, Communications and Strategic Initiatives.

After an extensive national search, the University is bringing the top candidates to campus next month for interviews. Interested campus and community members, along with the media, are invited to attend an open session with each candidate, from 4:45pm to 5:15pm, in the Club Level of Governors Stadium.

Final candidates for Austin Peay Athletics Director are (Top L to R) Ryan Ivey, Jason Coomer, Roderick D. Perry and Jim Sarra.

Final candidates for Austin Peay Athletics Director are (Top L to R) Ryan Ivey, Jason Coomer, Roderick D. Perry and Jim Sarra.

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NASA’s Cassini spacecraft reveals Ocean on Saturn’s moon Enceladus may have Hydrothermal Activity

 

Written by Preston Dyches
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – NASA’s Cassini spacecraft has provided scientists the first clear evidence that Saturn’s moon Enceladus exhibits signs of present-day hydrothermal activity which may resemble that seen in the deep oceans on Earth. The implications of such activity on a world other than our planet open up unprecedented scientific possibilities.

“These findings add to the possibility that Enceladus, which contains a subsurface ocean and displays remarkable geologic activity, could contain environments suitable for living organisms,” said John Grunsfeld, astronaut and associate administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “The locations in our solar system where extreme environments occur in which life might exist may bring us closer to answering the question: are we alone in the universe.”

This cutaway view of Saturn's moon Enceladus is an artist's rendering that depicts possible hydrothermal activity that may be taking place on and under the seafloor of the moon's subsurface ocean, based on recently published results from NASA's Cassini mission. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This cutaway view of Saturn’s moon Enceladus is an artist’s rendering that depicts possible hydrothermal activity that may be taking place on and under the seafloor of the moon’s subsurface ocean, based on recently published results from NASA’s Cassini mission. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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