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Topic: Wolf Creek Dam

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Dams saved $1.72 billion in Flood Damage

 

Written by Leon Roberts
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN –  The 10 dams operated by the U.S. Corps of Engineers in the Cumberland River Basin performed as designed during the wettest February on record, saving an estimated $1.72 billion in would-be flood damage to the region.

The ability to hold back water where possible reduced impacts in Nashville by as much as 16 feet, preventing $1.5 billion of damage that would have resulted from higher water. The water level on the Cumberland River in Music City reached 40.93 feet with projects operating, but would have reached an estimated 57.2 feet if the storage projects upstream were not in existence.

Dale Hollow Dam on the Obey River in Celina, Tennessee, discharges water March 4th, 2019. (Don Busbice, USACE)

Dale Hollow Dam on the Obey River in Celina, Tennessee, discharges water March 4th, 2019. (Don Busbice, USACE)

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers dispels Wolf Creek Dam safety rumors

 

Written by Leon Roberts
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District is dispelling rumors that Wolf Creek Dam in Jamestown, KY, is in danger of imminent failure.

A local radio station commentator put out false information this morning that Wolf Creek Dam could fail at any time and local residents downstream needed to formulate an evacuation plan.

“This is completely false,” said Kyle Hayworth, Dam Safety Program Manager with the Nashville District. “The dam is not failing. There have been no signs of distress with the project, and our dam safety staff has been and will continue to monitor all of the Cumberland River Basin dams throughout this high-water event.”

Wolf Creek Dam in Jamestown, KY, releases water from Lake Cumberland February 20th, 2019. (Misty Cravens, USACE)

Wolf Creek Dam in Jamestown, KY, releases water from Lake Cumberland February 20th, 2019. (Misty Cravens, USACE)

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers managing its dams in Cumberland River System

 

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District is managing releases as appropriate at its dams on the Cumberland River and its tributaries due to recent and ongoing rain events and those forecasted for the next week.

The National Weather Service has issued a Flood Watch for much of the Cumberland River Basin and is forecasting the potential for some rivers and streams to surpass flood stage.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Water Management Center is passing water through Cheatham Dam on the Cumberland River in Ashland City, Tennessee at a rate exceeding 90,000 cubic feet per second. Cheatham Lock is closed because of the strong currents flowing through the dam. (Mark Rankin)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Water Management Center is passing water through Cheatham Dam on the Cumberland River in Ashland City, Tennessee at a rate exceeding 90,000 cubic feet per second. Cheatham Lock is closed because of the strong currents flowing through the dam. (Mark Rankin)

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I. Are you ready for disaster? Assess your risk

 

Editors Note: We are offering a reprint of this five-part article, published on Daily Kos and originally published online by AlphaGeek {9.9.05}. From the diaries — Plutonium Page. The series offers a practical way to assess risk and prepare a variety of disaster scenarios. The series will appear chapter by chapter at 3 p.m. today through Friday.

Something bad is going to happen, and there’s nothing you can do to stop it.

Preparing to deal with a disaster is like going off of a ski jump. If you put off your planning until things start happening, it’s far too late to make much of a difference. Once you’re headed down that ski jump, the time for planning and preparation is over.

On the other hand, being prepared for disaster does not have to be time-consuming or expensive. In this multi-part series of DailyKos Diaries, I will share with you, dear reader, many of the lessons I’ve learned regarding the most effective ways to prepare for an emergency.

This is the first installment in a multi-part series on personal disaster preparedness. Your humble correspondent is a Silicon Valley technical executive with both professional and personal experience in risk assessment and disaster-readiness planning. Links to reference materials, including planning guides and reference information, will be found at the end of the final Diaries in this series. «Read the rest of this article»

 

Emergency Response teams ready for Wolf Creek Dam disaster

 

wcd6.jpgWolf Creek Dam. It’s a peaceful place in Kentucky, northeast of Nashville and the Clarksville area, and it’s a potential crisis in the making that emergency management officials are keeping their eye on. A wary eye. On the seepage, the erosion of its limestone base, and its sinkholes.

These and other factors that make Wolf Creek one of the five worst dams in the country, one with a high risk of failure. If Wolf Creek fails, parts of Clarksville will be underwater in about 33 hours.

wc-inside-dam.jpgThe U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Major Rehabilitation Report issued in 2006 recommended a $306 million fix for the Wolf Creek Dam, a project that began over a year ago and is expected to take four years to complete. (At right, workers inside the dam effecting repairs)

Failure of the Wolf Creek dam is scenario on the top of the list for Emergency Management officials at the federal, state and local levels; they meet weekly to address a multitude of issues that could affect our community at large, coordinating services and support systems for a safe and fast response if the worst should happen. «Read the rest of this article»

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