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Topic: X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology Aircraft

NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology Aircraft is making good progress

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationEdwards, CA – Assembly of NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology aircraft is continuing during 2020 and making good progress, despite challenges such as those imposed by the unexpected global pandemic.

NASA plans as early as 2024 to fly the X-59 over select communities on missions to gather information about how the public will react to the level of quiet supersonic flight noise the aircraft is designed to produce – if they hear anything at all.

NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology X-plane, or QueSST, is designed to fly faster than the speed of sound, without producing a loud, disruptive sonic boom, which is typically heard on the ground below aircraft flying at such speeds. Instead, with the X-59, people on the ground will hear nothing more than a quiet sonic thump – if they hear anything at all. (Lockheed Martin)

NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology X-plane, or QueSST, is designed to fly faster than the speed of sound, without producing a loud, disruptive sonic boom, which is typically heard on the ground below aircraft flying at such speeds. Instead, with the X-59, people on the ground will hear nothing more than a quiet sonic thump – if they hear anything at all. (Lockheed Martin)

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NASA Ames Research Center Wind Tunnels performs Ground Testing before you Fly

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationMountain View, CA – If you’ve ever flown on a plane, you’ve probably been in a vehicle that NASA helped develop. Because before something can fly in the sky, it needs to “fly” on the ground – and for that you need a wind tunnel. Several of these often huge and essential facilities are found at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley – including the biggest (two!) in the world.

A wind tunnel works by moving air past a stationary object, making it seem like the object is flying. The tunnel is essentially a giant tube with air flowing through it, usually moved along by fans.

This system of fans moves air through the world’s largest wind tunnels, at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley. Each of the six fans is 40 feet in diameter and is driven by a 22,500-horsepower electric motor. Two figures near fan 5 give a sense of scale. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Tom Trower)

This system of fans moves air through the world’s largest wind tunnels, at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley. Each of the six fans is 40 feet in diameter and is driven by a 22,500-horsepower electric motor. Two figures near fan 5 give a sense of scale. (NASA/Ames Research Center/Tom Trower)

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NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology aircraft uses parts from other aircrafts

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – A time-honored tradition employed by the aerospace community for decades is continuing with the assembly of NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology aircraft at the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works® factory in California.

Perfectly acceptable components from other aircraft – some major, some minor – are finding new life as parts installed on the X-59, an experimental airplane whose mission is to help open a new era of commercial supersonic air travel over land.

NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology aircraft being assembled at the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works® factory in Palmdale, California. (Lockheed Martin)

NASA’s X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology aircraft being assembled at the Lockheed Martin Skunk Works® factory in Palmdale, California. (Lockheed Martin)

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NASA looks at fresh ideas for the future of Aviation

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA says the future of aviation doesn’t look the same as it did just five years ago. In fact, it looks more exciting and promising than ever before.

During that time companies not usually associated with the aviation community have entered the market, demand for new services by air has grown, and technologies have advanced to enable turning long-sought dreams into reality.

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate has updated its Strategic Implementation Plan for 2019. The plan describes the global trends influencing today’s and tomorrow’s aviation community and explains the six areas in which NASA’s aeronautical innovators are conducting research. (NASA)

NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate has updated its Strategic Implementation Plan for 2019. The plan describes the global trends influencing today’s and tomorrow’s aviation community and explains the six areas in which NASA’s aeronautical innovators are conducting research. (NASA)

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NASA has big plans for 2020

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In 2020, NASA will be taking long strides toward returning astronauts to the Moon, continuing the exploration of Mars and developing new technology to make supersonic aircraft fly more quietly.

Artemis: Returning astronauts to the Moon

Under Artemis, NASA will send new science instruments and technology demonstrations to study the Moon, accelerate plans to send astronauts to the Moon by 2024, and establish sustainable lunar exploration by 2028.

Launching Americans from U.S. soil, sending a new rover to Mars and continuing to prepare for human missions to the Moon are just a few of the things NASA has planned for 2020. (NASA TV/Lacey Young)

Launching Americans from U.S. soil, sending a new rover to Mars and continuing to prepare for human missions to the Moon are just a few of the things NASA has planned for 2020. (NASA TV/Lacey Young)

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NASA Research in 2019 Enables Future Aviation Advances

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA’s aeronautical innovators this past year worked diligently in their mission to explore safe advances in atmospheric flight that directly benefit all of us, meet the rapidly evolving needs of industry, spark economic growth, and ensure the nation remains the world’s leader in all things related to flight.

Based on our strategic research plan, NASA’s flight team during 2019 was widely focused on conducting scientific and engineering investigations in three broad areas.

The retired USS Lexington aircraft carrier – now on display at Corpus Christi, Texas – was one of the sites where NASA and industry researchers during 2019 demonstrated increasingly complex traffic management capabilities flying Unmanned Aircraft Systems. (NASA)

The retired USS Lexington aircraft carrier – now on display at Corpus Christi, Texas – was one of the sites where NASA and industry researchers during 2019 demonstrated increasingly complex traffic management capabilities flying Unmanned Aircraft Systems. (NASA)

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NASA clears X-59 Quiet Supersonic Aircraft for Final Assembly

 

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – NASA’s first large scale, piloted X-plane in more than three decades is cleared for final assembly and integration of its systems following a major project review by senior managers held Thursday at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

The management review, known as Key Decision Point-D (KDP-D), was the last programmatic hurdle for the X-59 Quiet SuperSonic Technology (QueSST) aircraft to clear before officials meet again in late 2020 to approve the airplane’s first flight in 2021.

Illustration of the completed X-59 QueSST landing on a runway. (Lockheed Martin)

Illustration of the completed X-59 QueSST landing on a runway. (Lockheed Martin)

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