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Topic: Bigelow Expandable Activity Module

NASA advances Exploration Objectives in 2016

 

Written by Bob Jacobs / Allard Beutel
NASA Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – In 2016, NASA drove advances in technology, science, aeronautics and space exploration that enhanced the world’s knowledge, innovation, and stewardship of Earth.

“This past year marked record-breaking progress in our exploration objectives,” said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden. “We advanced the capabilities we’ll need to travel farther into the solar system while increasing observations of our home and the universe, learning more about how to continuously live and work in space, and, of course, inspiring the next generation of leaders to take up our Journey to Mars and make their own discoveries.”

This illustration depicts NASA's Juno spacecraft at Jupiter, with its solar arrays and main antenna pointed toward the distant sun and Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

This illustration depicts NASA’s Juno spacecraft at Jupiter, with its solar arrays and main antenna pointed toward the distant sun and Earth. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

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NASA reports Astronaut Jeff Williams to be first human to enter Expandable Module deployed in Space

 

NASA’s Johnson Space Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationHouston, TX – On Monday, June 6th, astronaut Jeff Williams will enter the first human-rated expandable module deployed in space, a technology demonstration to investigate the potential challenges and benefits of expandable habitats for deep space exploration and commercial low-Earth orbit applications.

Williams and the NASA and Bigelow Aerospace teams working at Mission Control Center at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston expanded the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) by filling it with air during more than seven hours of operations Saturday, May 28th.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM)

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM)

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NASA’s BEAM module attached to International Space Station now Fully Expanded and Pressurized

 

NASA

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – Pressurization of the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) began at 4:34pm EDT, and the eight tanks filled with air completed full pressurization of the module 10 minutes later at 4:44pm. BEAM’s pressure will be equalized with that of the International Space Station, where it will remain attached for a two-year test period.

The module measured just over 7 feet long and just under 7.75 feet in diameter in its packed configuration. BEAM now measures more than 13 feet long and about 10.5 feet in diameter to create 565 cubic feet of habitable volume. It weighs approximately 3,000 pounds.

The BEAM expansion took several hours today as astronaut Jeff Williams sent two dozen pulses of air into the expandable module. (NASA TV)

The BEAM expansion took several hours today as astronaut Jeff Williams sent two dozen pulses of air into the expandable module. (NASA TV)

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NASA will connect Bigelow Expandable Activity Module to International Space Station, Saturday

 

Written by Cheryl Warner
NASA’s Headquarters

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationWashington, D.C. – The first human-rated expandable structure that may help inform the design of deep space habitats is set to be installed to the International Space Station Saturday, April 16th. NASA Television coverage of the installation will begin at 5:30am EDT.

The Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM) will be attached to the station’s Tranquility module over a period of about four hours. Controllers in mission control at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston will remove BEAM from the unpressurized trunk of SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft, using the robotic Canadarm2, and move it into position next to Tranquility’s aft assembly port.

This artist’s concept depicts the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module attached to the International Space Station’s Tranquility module. (Bigelow Aerospace)

This artist’s concept depicts the Bigelow Expandable Activity Module attached to the International Space Station’s Tranquility module. (Bigelow Aerospace)

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