Clarksville, TN Online: News, Opinion, Arts & Entertainment.


Topic: Mississippi River

Waterfowl Dream Hunt, Gear Featured in Tennessee Wildlife Resources Conservation Raffle

 

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency - TWRANashville, TN – A four-person, two-day waterfowl hunting package at a prime West Tennessee location with Realtree Pro Tyler Jordan and Team Realtree during the 2020-21 hunting season is part outstanding packages available for a lucky winner in the 2020 Tennessee Conservation Raffle sponsored by the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Foundation.

The waterfowl hunting package is one of the seven, priceless outdoor experiences available to win this year.

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Conservation Raffle

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Conservation Raffle

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Dodging the Roadkill: The Adventure Of A Lifetime

 

Dodging the Roadkill - A Biker's JourneyClarksville, TN – I met Rob Leunberger during a recent memorial run he organized for a friend who tragically lost his life on the back of his motorcycle.  You can read that story here.

As I joined the group for the day’s ride, I was on the outside looking in.  I didn’t know most of  those who had gathered to honor their friend, on this scorching hot summer day. 

At the end of the day though, I had witnessed an amazing friendship among men and women, brought together by a motorcycle, with a love for one another that was special.  They would do ANYTHING for each other!

Rob Luenberger

Rob Luenberger

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District Dams saved $1.72 billion in Flood Damage

 

Written by Leon Roberts
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN –  The 10 dams operated by the U.S. Corps of Engineers in the Cumberland River Basin performed as designed during the wettest February on record, saving an estimated $1.72 billion in would-be flood damage to the region.

The ability to hold back water where possible reduced impacts in Nashville by as much as 16 feet, preventing $1.5 billion of damage that would have resulted from higher water. The water level on the Cumberland River in Music City reached 40.93 feet with projects operating, but would have reached an estimated 57.2 feet if the storage projects upstream were not in existence.

Dale Hollow Dam on the Obey River in Celina, Tennessee, discharges water March 4th, 2019. (Don Busbice, USACE)

Dale Hollow Dam on the Obey River in Celina, Tennessee, discharges water March 4th, 2019. (Don Busbice, USACE)

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TWRA announces New Fishing Regulations in Effect, new Tennessee Fishing Guide available

 

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) 

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency - TWRANashville, TN – Tennessee’s 2019-20 fishing regulations went into effect March 1st and anglers are encouraged to obtain the new Tennessee Fishing Guide now available at locations throughout the state, on the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency website (www.tnwildlife.org) and on the TWRA “On the App.”

Hard copies of the guide are available wherever hunting and fishing licenses are sold and at the TWRA’s four regional offices located in Jackson (Region I), Nashville (Region II), Crossville (Region III), and Morristown (Region IV). This year’s statewide and specific region regulation changes to are featured on page 4 of the guide.

2019-2020 Tennessee Fishing Guide

2019-2020 Tennessee Fishing Guide

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TWRA announces Big Game Hunting Closed in Mississippi River Floodwaters Zone

 

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA)

Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency - TWRAJackson, TN – Due to high waters in the Mississippi River Floodwaters Zone, the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency reports the closure of all big game hunting in the zone, effective Sunday, January 6th, 2019.

The Mississippi River stage has reached 34 feet at the Caruthersville, MO gauge. In accordance with Proclamation 16-45, all big game hunting is closed immediately in the Mississippi River Floodwaters Zone. The zone will remain closed until the Mississippi River state falls to 32 feet at the Memphis gauge.

Mississippi River Floodwaters Zone Map

Mississippi River Floodwaters Zone Map

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U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to store water at Barkley Reservoir, reduce Ohio River and Mississippi River flood crests

 

Written by Bill Peoples
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nashville District

U.S. Army Corps of EngineersNashville, TN – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Nashville District announced today that it is continuing its flood control operation by using flood control storage in Lake Barkley to help mitigate the ongoing flood event on the Ohio River. This may cause minor high water impacts to communities along the Cumberland River in Lyon and Trigg Counties in Kentucky, and Stewart and Montgomery Counties in Tennessee.

Releases from Barkley Dam on the Cumberland River in Kuttawa, KY, are being reduced today as the Ohio River flood crest passes downstream. This reduction in discharge contributes to lowering the crest on the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers, thereby reducing flood risk at cities such as Paducah, KY, Cairo, IL, Memphis, TN, Vicksburg MS, and New Orleans, LA.

Cumberland River may rise due to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers flood Control operation at Lake Barkley.

Cumberland River may rise due to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers flood Control operation at Lake Barkley.

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NASA and NOAA Satellites observe Hurricane Nate make Landfall

 

Written by Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationGreenbelt, MD – NASA’s Aqua satellite and NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite analyzed the temperatures in Hurricane Nate’s cloud tops and determined that the most powerful thunderstorms and heaviest rain areas were around the center of the tropical cyclone after it made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River.

At 8:00pm EDT/7:00pm CDT on October 7th, 2017 Hurricane Nate’s eye was at the mouth of the Mississippi River. National Weather Service radar data and surface observations indicated that Hurricane Nate made landfall near Biloxi, Mississippi, around 12:30am CDT/1:30am EDT on October 8th, with maximum winds of 85 mph (140 kph).

On October 8th at 4:20am EDT (0820 UTC) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite analyzed Nate's cloud top temperatures in infrared light and found strongest storms (yellow) around the center of circulation. (NASA/NRL)

On October 8th at 4:20am EDT (0820 UTC) the MODIS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite analyzed Nate’s cloud top temperatures in infrared light and found strongest storms (yellow) around the center of circulation. (NASA/NRL)

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Sections: Technology | No Comments
 


Clarksville Civil War Roundtable’s next meeting is July 19th, 2017

 

Clarksville Civil War RoundtableClarksville, TN – The next meeting of the Clarksville (TN) Civil War Roundtable will be on Wednesday, July 19th, 2017 at the Bone & Joint Center, 980 Professional Park Drive, right across the street from Tennova Healthcare. This is just off Dunlop Lane and Holiday Drive and only a few minutes east of Governor’s Square mall.

The meeting begins at 7:00 pm and is always open to the public. Members please bring a friend or two – new recruits are always welcomed.

Topic – “The Red River Campaign – Politics, Cotton and Failure”

The Red River Campaign

The Red River Campaign

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NASA’s DopplerScatt Radar to Benefit Weather and Climate Studies, Maritime Uses

 

Written by Andrew Good
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – Ocean currents and winds form an endless feedback loop: winds blow over the ocean’s surface, creating currents there. At the same time, the hot or cold water in these currents influences the wind’s speed.

This delicate dance is crucial to understanding Earth’s changing climate. Gathering data on this interaction can also help people track oil spills, plan shipping routes and understand ocean productivity in relation to fisheries.

Instruments already exist that measure ocean currents, and others that measure wind, such as NASA’s QuickScat and RapidScat. But a new, airborne radar instrument developed by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, is able to measure both.

2010 photo of a shoreline in Bay Jimmy, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, impacted by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Oil weakens and kills vegetation, leading to the loss of roots that help hold soil together. (Bruce A. Davis, Department of Homeland Security)

2010 photo of a shoreline in Bay Jimmy, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, impacted by the BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Oil weakens and kills vegetation, leading to the loss of roots that help hold soil together. (Bruce A. Davis, Department of Homeland Security)

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NASA uses Aircraft mounted instruments to examine growing Deltas in Louisiana

 

Written by Alan Buis
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory

NASA - National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationPasadena, CA – The Louisiana coastline is sinking under the Gulf of Mexico at the rate of about one football field of land every hour (about 18 square miles of land lost in a year). But within this sinking region, two river deltas are growing. The Atchafalaya River and its diversion channel, Wax Lake Outlet, are gaining about one football field of new land every 11 and 8 hours, respectively (1.5 and 2 square miles per year).

Last fall, a team from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, showed that radar, lidar and spectral instruments mounted on aircraft can be used to study the growing deltas, collecting data that can help scientists better understand how coastal wetlands will respond to global sea level rise.

False-color images of rising tide at Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, made by JPL's Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar instrument on Oct. 17, 2016. Red, blue and green correspond to different land-surface properties. Rising water appears as increasing darkness. (NCAR/JPL-Caltech)

False-color images of rising tide at Wax Lake Delta, Louisiana, made by JPL’s Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar instrument on Oct. 17, 2016. Red, blue and green correspond to different land-surface properties. Rising water appears as increasing darkness. (NCAR/JPL-Caltech)

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